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#1 gottagotomoz

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Posted 23 May 2011 - 04:46 PM

Hello all,

Before I start, I'd like to call to mind the fact that I could not find my answer directly through searching, although please feel free to redirect me if I am wrong.

Not long ago, I was introduced to bumping locks. Employed at my local hardware store, I have a general knowledge concerning keys and locks. Picking locks never made it past the occasional deadbolt, and of course pad locks. I recently purchased a bump key set from bumpkey.us however, while practicing on a kwikset deadbolt (set in a vise) I noticed how deep the cuts are, and how little metal is actually left, differentiating the valleys in the key. Compared to say an SC1, the KW1's key looks like a different cut. Is this how it's supposed to be? From what I have gathered, Kwiksets are among the easier of locks to bump, but with that said, out of about 200+ times, I have only been able to bump it four times. I have looked at different pictures of KW1 bump keys, and they look quite different. The triangles are much smaller on the KW1 than any other bump key I have come across. Am I missing something here? Also, I am using the pull out method, not minimal movement.

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#2 Customer Support

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 06:45 PM

Thanks for the question and welcome to the forum.

What you're describing (and posted a picture of) is a perfectly cut KW1 key. The OEM KW1 key is SUPPOSED to be cut wide like the picture shows. That said, BumpKey.us has developed a KW1-Narrow that is specifically cut "wrong" to make the peaks on the key higher. This narrow key works particularly well with locks which have had their pins replaced with non-oem pins. Going to the Kwikset bump key page and clicking on 'detailed images' you will see the KW1-narrow.

One thing to keep in mind is that with the Narrow key, it might not work with the wide pinned locks and vice versa.

If you have any further questions please feel free to ask!


Hello all,

Before I start, I'd like to call to mind the fact that I could not find my answer directly through searching, although please feel free to redirect me if I am wrong.

Not long ago, I was introduced to bumping locks. Employed at my local hardware store, I have a general knowledge concerning keys and locks. Picking locks never made it past the occasional deadbolt, and of course pad locks. I recently purchased a bump key set from bumpkey.us however, while practicing on a kwikset deadbolt (set in a vise) I noticed how deep the cuts are, and how little metal is actually left, differentiating the valleys in the key. Compared to say an SC1, the KW1's key looks like a different cut. Is this how it's supposed to be? From what I have gathered, Kwiksets are among the easier of locks to bump, but with that said, out of about 200+ times, I have only been able to bump it four times. I have looked at different pictures of KW1 bump keys, and they look quite different. The triangles are much smaller on the KW1 than any other bump key I have come across. Am I missing something here? Also, I am using the pull out method, not minimal movement.


James K. - Lead Support
For Order specific questions please use the 'contact us' link at the top of our store.


#3 gottagotomoz

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 09:39 PM

Thanks for the response and welcome :)

I bought a Kwikset deadbolt, solely for bumping and picking and set it in a vice. I thought I had the technique using the pull out method perfected with the No 1 Masterlock Padlock! guess it's back to basics for me! Anyway, considering this lock has been untouched, I gather the wide cut key is what I should be using, right? Also, I know there are many topics concerning this, and I will read and digest everything I find on here about it but would it be more effective to try the minimal movement method as well?

Thanks again.