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Height of the peak nearest the tip


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#1 psehorne

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 11:16 PM

Most of the bump keys I have seen have the peak nearest the tip left pretty much virgin; i.e., higher than the other peaks. For the pull-out method it would be this peak that bumps the 5th pin of a 5-pin lock or the 6th pin of a 6-pin lock. It seems to me that this creates a potential problem (and could account for some of the problems that are being encountered by some bumpers).

If the key/bottom pin in the aforementioned position is a long pin it would be possible that the high peak could actually raise the bottom pin into the shell and prevent successful bumping. I would think that this peak should be no higher than the rest of the peaks.... and generally speaking all the peaks should all be low enough to accommodate the longest pin that could be encountered for the particular manufacturer and model key/lock.

I have no bump keys yet since my order has not yet arrived; so the above is just based upon my understanding of the process and analysis of what is supposed to be happening, not on actual experience.

Paul

#2 sarg

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 02:47 PM

The bumpkeys as sent are not deburred. Add that to the high front and it's a real challenge to get the key totally out of the lock.

Plan on buffing the burrs off before usage.

#3 rucnok

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 08:17 PM

i got a set of 5 bumpkeys to play around with.

i'm trying the master lock key and cant do it.

how hard does the tap need to be?
should i be using the bump hammer?
i was using the side of a leatherman tool.
i got the keys from


#4 ndogg

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 03:07 PM

Most of the bump keys I have seen have the peak nearest the tip left pretty much virgin; i.e., higher than the other peaks. For the pull-out method it would be this peak that bumps the 5th pin of a 5-pin lock or the 6th pin of a 6-pin lock. It seems to me that this creates a potential problem (and could account for some of the problems that are being encountered by some bumpers).

If the key/bottom pin in the aforementioned position is a long pin it would be possible that the high peak could actually raise the bottom pin into the shell and prevent successful bumping. I would think that this peak should be no higher than the rest of the peaks.... and generally speaking all the peaks should all be low enough to accommodate the longest pin that could be encountered for the particular manufacturer and model key/lock.

I have no bump keys yet since my order has not yet arrived; so the above is just based upon my understanding of the process and analysis of what is supposed to be happening, not on actual experience.

Paul


I had the same question, whats the deal with the large front peak?

#5 Customer Support

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 05:07 PM

Welcome Ndogg,

I assume you are referring to the KW10 key. The front peak is bigger due to the way machines cut the key... it's just how tall the peak is when it's cut to PROPER code.

That said, we look into modifying the default code which might enable us to cut the 6th peak (the tip) down quite a bit. I can't immediately think of any reason why this would decline the success rate of bumping... it's not now it's "supposed to be" though.

James K. - Lead Support
For Order specific questions please use the 'contact us' link at the top of our store.