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Maybe over my head...


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#1 HalfLife1303

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Posted 30 October 2007 - 02:38 PM

I'm trying to figure out how to bump a BEST lock (the ones made by Stanley) with a "D" code. I saw on the product page that BEST locks are hard to bump anyway, and they don't sell a "D" bump key anyway.

Two questions: Why are they harder to bump? And should I even bother making one for myself if the pros don't recommend it?
Yep, I'm still a n00b.

#2 BLK

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Posted 30 October 2007 - 06:38 PM

http://www.bumpkeyfo...ght=best keyway
http://www.bumpkeyfo...ght=best keyway
http://www.bumpkeyfo...ght=best keyway
http://www.bumpkeyfo...ght=best keyway

Here are just a few of the threads that mention Best issues. It is very easy to destroy a Best lock while trying to bump it.
Bump it to the next level.

#3 HalfLife1303

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 12:34 PM

OK, so if I when I made the bump key, I attached a shoulder to the key, would that solve the majority of the problems? It seems to me a little solder and a bit of spare metal would go a long way to making this easier, particularly on noobs like me. Unless I'm misunderstanding?
Yep, I'm still a n00b.

#4 theopratr

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Posted 03 November 2007 - 06:18 PM

Adding a shoulder wouldn't do anything to help your case, because unless the key is far enough into the lock for the tip to touch the back plate, it's not in far enough to bump... thus adding a shoulder would be rather useless. The bottom line is that the key needs to be shortened by shaving some of the tip off, and then treated gently. In this regard, adding a shoulder could reduce some of the force applied to the back plate, but the additional problems that would result from adding a shoulder, and then precisely filing this added shoulder would greatly exceed the benefits.

BEST locks are quality locks. Since the tolerances are so tight, bumping should technically become easier to do. Obviously the problems that result from the back plate offset this quite a bit, as do the fact that many of them have six or seven pins. The bottom line is that all you're really moving by bumping a lock is a handful of top pins against their springs... you need next to no force. While some people can get away with really batting Kwiksets and Schlages to get them to open, BESTs and other higher security locks require some skill and a feather touch.