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what type of key is this?


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#1 sublimegd

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 01:01 AM

Hey guys, I'm starting to fiddle around with lock picking and bumping as a hobby. I've always wanted to learn how to do this james bond style. Anyway, I'm just wondering what type of key this is?

http://store.kelcola...PROD&ProdID=302

I've been told locks like this are harder to bump? Thanks.

#2 razlex

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 06:52 AM

it's for the coin lockbox on comercial laundry machines... and if i had to guess, you shouldn't be opening it.

#3 theopratr

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 04:51 PM

Above and beyond the excellent point razlex makes, it's a double wafer lock, which can't be bumped.

#4 sublimegd

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 06:02 PM

Your right, it is for a retired commercial laundry machine that my friends dad has in their basement. I'm not trying to steal $10 in quaters... but I am curious about how hard it is to do. I've read that wafer locks can be bumped (some guy does it on youtube) and I know wafer locks (single,double) can be picked by any skilled lock picker. But why can a single wafer lock be bumped but a double can't? or is this guy on youtube just mistaken? Thanks for the condescending replies.

#5 razlex

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 08:10 PM

although i'm new here aswell.... it just seems suspicious when someones first post on a forum for opening locks asks how to open a lock to which they only have a picture from a website selling the coin lockbox. had the picture been of the cylinder for the lock sitting on your computer desk, i wouldn't have made that assumption.... anyhow, if your inquiry is truly for educational purposes only... then i appologize.

#6 johnsimms

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 08:37 PM

it is a magical key from the land of OZ. Dont flaunt nor worry it.

#7 theopratr

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Posted 25 September 2007 - 04:47 PM

I have a video of myself farting into an automobile lock and opening it on YouTube. Bumping a wafer lock is just about equally possible.

Bumping, in very short, is the jumping of the top pins in a locking system such that they all clear the shear line simultaneously, thus allowing the lock to be opened. Wafer locks don't have top pins. Actually, they don't have pins at all. That's why they're called "wafer tumbler locks", not "pin tumbler locks."

This explanation precludes any response concerning the remainder of your question.

If your intentions really aren't criminal, which I see as completely possible, I would recommend learning to pick locks. As for the ease with which it can be picked... if the lock you pictured is the same brand or type as the one you are working with, it's not going to be easy to pick - you have two rows of interlocking wafers that play off of each other, making it very difficult to get the lock to set. The lock is a "full turn" variety, which means to open it, you will have to successfully pick it between 2 and 4 times, and a similar number of times to close it. This is a security feature found on many locks that go into service with older vending machines, coin laundry, change machines, etc. as while they are not impossible to pick, it is difficult, and you would need to pick it several times just to get it unlocked, thus making any criminal action take that much longer.
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#8 sublimegd

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Posted 25 September 2007 - 07:26 PM

haha, thanks theopratr. just wondering, is there such thing as spring loaded wafer locks? Also, do jiggler type methods of lock picking more or less work by the same principle as bumping? That is, lining the pins up to the correct height. It seems that jiggling might work for a wafer lock then, if you were able to hit the wafers in the correct way? I'm having a hard time finding a good description of how exactly a wafer lock works, even what a "wafer" is in the context of wafer locks.

#9 BLK

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Posted 25 September 2007 - 07:50 PM

haha, thanks theopratr. just wondering, is there such thing as spring loaded wafer locks? Also, do jiggler type methods of lock picking more or less work by the same principle as bumping? That is, lining the pins up to the correct height. It seems that jiggling might work for a wafer lock then, if you were able to hit the wafers in the correct way? I'm having a hard time finding a good description of how exactly a wafer lock works, even what a "wafer" is in the context of wafer locks.


Go buy a cheap desk lock...it is a wafer lock...and take it apart. There are springs and wafers inside the plug. The wafers can be removed by prying them out. The springs may fly out when the wafer is removed or you may have to manually remove them. Then you can have fun putting it back together.

Before you dissemble the lock, separate the plug from the cylinder and put the key in the plug. Watch what happens to the wafers, they move so that they are flush with the edge of the plug which allows the plug to turn inside the cylinder, but only when the proper key is inserted.

Trying to bump a wafer lock would only bend or tear the wafers. When you look at the inner workings of the wafer lock, you will see what is being said here.

http://www.acehardwa...&Source=froogle They are cheap. Less than a pack of cigs. Buy one and learn how it works.
Bump it to the next level.

#10 neuromonkey

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Posted 11 October 2007 - 01:49 PM

> it's a double wafer lock

Mmmm... Double wafers.