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How to cut this one


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#1 lapo

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 03:25 AM

Hi.
I'm new on forum.
I'm making my first bumpkey for fun.
Already started to cut, but I dont want to cut it wrong, so I came here for help.
I'm attaching picture of my key.
Could please someone draw me a line, how to cut it.

Many thanks!

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  • Attached File  1.JPG   16.6KB   22 downloads


#2 BLK

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 07:23 AM

Posted Image make it look like this.
Bump it to the next level.

#3 lapo

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 07:58 AM

Thanks, I'll try and post result.

#4 lapo

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 09:06 AM

Ok here is my key so far.
Do I have to cut off those parts marked with red ?
It goes into lock, but it stops at upper red mark.
Do I have to cut it deeper ?

Thanks!

Attached Files

  • Attached File  22.JPG   14.48KB   22 downloads
  • Attached File  11.JPG   17.35KB   21 downloads


#5 BLK

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 10:11 AM

Take the peaks down like on the key I posted. Your key looks like it would get stuck in the lock. Also, your key looks like it might be a 6 pin instead of a 5 pin, in which case, you would need to make one more valley at the tip of the blade. Great file work, just needs tweaked alittle.
Bump it to the next level.

#6 govt1911

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 10:13 AM

Basically, cut it to the depth of the lowest cut already present. It looks like you have a "max depth" cut already there. (third from the top of your pic).
That's what I did for my first couple bumpkeys and they match the depth of the keys I ordered from bumpkey.us. (This won't work if ALL the cuts on your key are shallow)

#7 lapo

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 02:29 AM

ok I've checked and previous key was 6-pin :( now I have new 5pin key.
I've cut it (see attachment).
Should those peaks be more rounded or more like /\ shape ?

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  • Attached File  1.JPG   16.2KB   21 downloads


#8 theopratr

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 10:06 AM

Although it's possible to find success using rounded peaks, the triangular ones, I find, are much easier to both cut and use. The triangular shape allows for a faster change in direction in terms of energy and makes the exact depths of your grooves less critical.

#9 lapo

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 10:10 AM

What about that last peak ? should it be bigger than others, or should I cut it like others ?

#10 lapo

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 10:52 AM

After some more tweaking with fingernail file, it looks like this.
Still don't know what to do with last peak, should I cut it like others or leave it.

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  • Attached File  2.JPG   33.17KB   18 downloads


#11 lapo

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 11:04 AM

Compare with bumpkey.us key.
Could someone explain me why is first peak larger ?

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#12 BLK

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 03:49 PM

Compare with bumpkey.us key.
Could someone explain me why is first peak larger ?


That key looks good!

The last peak at the tip of the key is larger because the last center of cut is just that far back from the tip and that is what is left over when the key is cut properly. You can trim it down if you want to but it does not have to be done for the key to work as a bump key.

Now, before you use it, take it to the local hardware or Home Depot and get a couple of copies made and DO NOT use the original or you could be doing this...:brickwall:...if you mess up your key and have no copies made.
Bump it to the next level.

#13 Customer Support

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 05:09 PM

Bling bling -- GREAT advise from an Ungodly Bumper!

And as a follow up, you can actually remove quite a bit of the peak on that key. The original type of key we offered was made in such a way that there was actually a part of the tip missing. If you search around you should be able to find the thread about it.

James K. - Lead Support
For Order specific questions please use the 'contact us' link at the top of our store.


#14 lapo

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 03:44 AM

Thanks for help.
Now I need some practice.
Is this lock bumpable (european lock): ISEO

Edit:
looks like it is, the guy on youtube bumps same lock:

Nice demostration:

Why doesn't he pull back 1 pin when bumping ? Thats other method, when you don't have to pul back 1 pin, right ?

Thanks for help

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#15 lapo

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 08:20 AM

Ok back to first key in this post, that I thought that is 6pin.
I disassembled lock and it is 5-pin lock (see picture).
Could someone tell me, are those 2 upper (spring)pins special shaped(anti lockpicking) pins ? Or is this shape normal ?
Where can I get length of 9-pin for this lock? Those 3 largest pins on picture are probably 7 or 8-pin ?

Posted Image

#16 theopratr

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 12:39 PM

Your lock is strange, in that the key that was thought to be a six-pin does, in fact, have six distinct cuts. Perhaps this was part of a master keyed system where some locks have five pins and some have six pins.

The upper pins that you refer to are special security pins called "spool pins". They make lockpicking a bit more difficult for the beginner, but certainly not impossible. High security locks generally have five or six spool pins, where as this lock only has two. When bumping, make sure to use very light tension, or else the spool pins may get stuck at the shear line.

Search the internet for depth specifications for your particular lock. If this doesn't work, compare with other keys of the same brand and figure out what the lowest cut is by comparison, and measure with a micrometer.

#17 lapo

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 02:31 PM

Thanks for info.
I'll make another bump key for that lock and try to bump it.
Then I'll buy some new locks and do further research. :smile:

#18 lapo

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 11:28 AM

Ok I made another bumpkey for that first lock that I've posted.
Here are pictures:

Posted Image

Posted Image

I've successfully bumped original lock that I've posted in this thread. But not so easy, I did it only about 3-4 times for now.
I'm using minimal movement method.
Maybe shoulder isn't filed enough ?
What if I want to use pull-back1-pin method ? How should I file that last TIP-pin then ?

#19 lapo

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 01:59 PM

Ok I got that bump-feeling now for minimal movement method. I can bump easy now. It's really great feeling :biggrin:
Thanks for help!

#20 theopratr

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 07:16 PM

Glad to hear it. :)

Takes some practice, but once you have it down, the feeling is unparalleled.