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How did YOU get into bumping?


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#1 govt1911

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Posted 22 July 2007 - 01:41 AM

I'm a curious person by nature, and I was wondering how/why most of ya'll got interested in bumping locks.

I'll go first.:smile:

I've been in the Army for 17 years now and have bounced around the world numerous times (I'm currently on my 11th deployment). I've always been interested in all things mechanical and also do a bit of gunsmithing as a hobby.
I got interested in locksmithing back when I was in Bosnia in 96-97 and mail ordered a set of pics and a basic book. It was fun, as well as useful "at work". LOL (Hey, in the Army EVERYTHING is locked and someone is ALWAYS losing the damn keys!) It's been kinda fun to be the guy that people go to. "Hey, PVT Smith lost the keys AGAIN, go find SGT Payne!" LOL

Anyway, was looking up locksmithing stuff online and ran across some info on bumping locks, did some more looking, found a bunch of junk info and then I found BumpkeyForum.com. Great site, interesting and VERY helpful people.


Soooooooo, let's hear how YOU got into bumping!!!

#2 BLK

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Posted 22 July 2007 - 06:36 AM

First, THANK YOU FOR SERVING AND FOR PROTECTING OUR FREEDOM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :bow::bow::bow:

Second, Welcome to the forum. You will find lots of info on bumping locks, making keys and many other lock related things.

I am a locksmith. I occassionally use bumping to get locks unlocked. Plus, it is just so much fun.

Thank you again for serving our country. Be safe and shoot straight.
Bump it to the next level.

#3 govt1911

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Posted 22 July 2007 - 09:20 AM

thanks BLK.

Now here's another question for all of the locksmiths out there.

How does one get involved in the locksmithing business? I'll be retiring from the Army in a couple years and am interested in getting a job working as/for a locksmith. Would one of the corrospondance courses help? Do I need to become buddies with a locksmith so he can bring me "into the fold"?


Any pointers/info you could provide would be appreciated.

Thanks again

#4 BLK

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Posted 22 July 2007 - 04:29 PM

Correspondance courses for anything are sort of like learning to swim by mail, but some folks can do it. Locksmithing is fun if you have mechanical skills and good eyes (or at least good glasses). A hands on course with classroom time is available in a few places--google is your friend. And there are a couple of good correspondance courses--Foley-Belsaw is one. You only get the very basics either way. The rest of your education starts the day you go on your first call and ends when you stop working as a locksmith. I learn something new every day and have been doing this too long. Some lock shops will start you as an apprentice at the bottom of the pay scale and others are 'national' companies that let you ride with someone for a while before you get to go it alone. Another approach is to get with a smithy that is about to retire and work with him until you can by the business from him.
Bump it to the next level.

#5 govt1911

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 04:46 AM

thanks BLK. I'm looking into some of the hands on courses for when I get out of the Army. Any particular ones you reccomend or ones you'd advise to avoid?

Thanks for the info. Not much traffic around here lately, is there?

#6 ViralYouth

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 03:36 PM

Well I'm a trained locksmith and I read about it on a forum. I tried to make my own bumpkey but I didn't get the depth or spacing right. That's how I got into bumping.

#7 Rogue

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Posted 08 August 2007 - 05:42 PM

I'm a locksmith in TN, and I took the Foley Belsaw Course. I would highly recommend them if correspondence courses are the way you want to go. But if you want the grade A top of the line training I would say Lockmasters in KY, their course is a bit pricey but it takes a fraction of the time and you will learn the proper way of doing things, plus you get hands on training with a professional locksmith as an instructor there to help you.
Hope this helped.

PS: for a correspondence course avoid PCDI, they are a joke.

#8 Gobias

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 11:35 AM

I probably got on like quite of few people here. I recently have gotten into lock picking, and while looking for info on lock picking online, found bumpkey.us.
ROUS's? I don't believe the exist.

#9 Schneider

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 01:27 AM

Once I found an old lock and saw the working from inside but didn't got everything. I read in lots of articles how lock works and we can open that without original keys. I just tried opening that after reading few tutorials and that start my journey to the bumping.
Schneider
NYC Locksmith