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#1 MontrealHomegrown

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 04:17 PM

Hey guys, just wanted to say Im new to this site and very interessted in bumping locks. I have a few questions about the limitations of the keys. I live in Canada and was wondering what kinda locks this would work on. For example if I were to walk down a strip mall and try out a bump key on a corresponding lock would the majority of them open? I guess what Im trying to ask is.. is this only useful for house locks or are the more high security locks easy to manipulate as well? What about car door locks, main school doors ect ect..

P.s. Not planning on doing anything criminal with this information just trying to understand the limitation of the keys. I was reading some of the posts and someone said if you buy the set of 11 keys you can manipulate almost any pin/tumbler lock.

Any help would be much appreciated..

Also if anyone knows about weither it is legal to have bump keys in Canada this would help me greatly.
:cool:

#2 defconlocker

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 12:33 AM

Same here. I'm new, i just found out about these keys a few days ago on youtube. I myself, very much enjoy working with my hands. I love fiddling with electronics and i do all of the repairs around the house. I use to work in a stained glass studio. The one thing I learned their was patience. That and this is very important everyone, is important in every single trade craft. So any way i saw this video about bump keys and said wow, being a locksmith doesnt sound so bad. so i found this site, ordered my self the 11 key bundle. Now im waiting. I was looking around online and found out about the defcon conventions, and after I read about the speed locking competitions. I am enthralled.
So, obviously i am a newbie and I was wondering whether any of the experienced bumpers or pickers( and i wouldnt mind if you guys can tell me what the nicknames for this people in this sort of trade are). can tell me how I would go about learning how to become a locksmith, are their like special training courses where people have lots of locks to use and figure them out. and I would love to learn how to pick a lock. apparently the best method is to just play around and make your own tools. but i have none of those advantages. at best i have a few simple tools like screw drivers, a master lock and the lock on my front door.
so any advice on how to get started in this sort of trade would be greatly appreciated.
and if anyone knows any lock clubs in the new york city area. like the one in sweden or london, the guys who found out about lock bumping. I would love to join.
anyway, thank you in advance for your help. bye.

#3 Rogue

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 08:06 AM

Hey guys, just wanted to say Im new to this site and very interessted in bumping locks. I have a few questions about the limitations of the keys. I live in Canada and was wondering what kinda locks this would work on. For example if I were to walk down a strip mall and try out a bump key on a corresponding lock would the majority of them open? I guess what Im trying to ask is.. is this only useful for house locks or are the more high security locks easy to manipulate as well? What about car door locks, main school doors ect ect..

P.s. Not planning on doing anything criminal with this information just trying to understand the limitation of the keys. I was reading some of the posts and someone said if you buy the set of 11 keys you can manipulate almost any pin/tumbler lock.

Any help would be much appreciated..

Also if anyone knows about weither it is legal to have bump keys in Canada this would help me greatly.
:cool:


First off welcome to the site.
Most of this has been covered in other posts but i'll give you a quick run down. Bump keys will work for about 80% of all pin tumbler locks, thats most residential and commercial locks. There are a few out there that still as of yet no one has found the defect in their design to be manipulated.
Car doors are wafer locks, they need a jiggler, which... well... you jiggle. don't expect this to work on many ignitions though as most cars especially late model have electronic secondary measures.


Same here. I'm new, i just found out about these keys a few days ago on youtube. I myself, very much enjoy working with my hands. I love fiddling with electronics and i do all of the repairs around the house. I use to work in a stained glass studio. The one thing I learned their was patience. That and this is very important everyone, is important in every single trade craft. So any way i saw this video about bump keys and said wow, being a locksmith doesnt sound so bad. so i found this site, ordered my self the 11 key bundle. Now im waiting. I was looking around online and found out about the defcon conventions, and after I read about the speed locking competitions. I am enthralled.
So, obviously i am a newbie and I was wondering whether any of the experienced bumpers or pickers( and i wouldnt mind if you guys can tell me what the nicknames for this people in this sort of trade are). can tell me how I would go about learning how to become a locksmith, are their like special training courses where people have lots of locks to use and figure them out. and I would love to learn how to pick a lock. apparently the best method is to just play around and make your own tools. but i have none of those advantages. at best i have a few simple tools like screw drivers, a master lock and the lock on my front door.
so any advice on how to get started in this sort of trade would be greatly appreciated.
and if anyone knows any lock clubs in the new york city area. like the one in sweden or london, the guys who found out about lock bumping. I would love to join.
anyway, thank you in advance for your help. bye.



Welcome as well

Locksmithing is far more than just picking locks. It is a tedious time consuming trade, that will take years to master. Don't get me wrong, I love it, but it takes a whole lot of time. Now if you still want to become a locksmith I would suggest three different options. The best: an apprenticeship... find a local locksmith that would be willing to take you on as an apprentice, on the job training is always the best if you have a good teacher. Good: Lockmasters in KY... this is a locksmithing school, you get hands on training from instructors who were professional locksmiths for many many years. OK: Correspondence courses: they are ok but you don't get anyone there to correct you on technique when your working. Foley Belsaw would be the best for the correspondence course.

Sorry for the ungodly long post. Hope this all helped.
You have a kwikset knob lock and no dead bolt on your doors and you think you can keep me out... aww thats so cute.

#4 pickbuster

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 09:40 AM

Hello from another new member. My name is Ron and I am the marketing consultant for www.pickbuster.co.uk which is a company that sells a liquid treatment which can help to protect locks from bumping and electric picks.

I am not going to spam the forums, I hope I will be able to make a positive contribution to the community, and I look forward to talking with you all.

Regards
Ron

#5 Gobias

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 10:39 AM

Car doors are wafer locks, they need a jiggler,


Rogue, you mention wafer locks in cars. I'm new to bump keys and lock picking, would you mind telling me the difference between pins and wafers?

#6 Rogue

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 07:13 PM

I am assuming that you know how a pin tumbler lock works so i'm gonna skip that.

If you look at the pic below you will see a wafer lock... this one in particular is from a BMW. notice the metal plates, these are the wafers. This lock uses wafers instead of pins, other than that it operates essentially the same as a pin tumbler.

Attached Files


You have a kwikset knob lock and no dead bolt on your doors and you think you can keep me out... aww thats so cute.

#7 Gobias

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 07:30 PM

Okay that is making more sense now. When I looked up wafer on wikipedia and got something actually related to locks, the diagram shown made it appear the same as a pin and tumbler lock, so I at first thought wafer was another world for pin, but that cleared everything up. Thanks
ROUS's? I don't believe the exist.

#8 Rogue

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 10:41 PM

no problem. Anyway i can help just let me know.
You have a kwikset knob lock and no dead bolt on your doors and you think you can keep me out... aww thats so cute.

#9 Customer Support

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 01:35 AM

Not much else I can say expect for 'Welcome everyone!!'

James K. - Lead Support
For Order specific questions please use the 'contact us' link at the top of our store.


#10 Rogue

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 08:42 AM

thank you.
You have a kwikset knob lock and no dead bolt on your doors and you think you can keep me out... aww thats so cute.

#11 samblack

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Posted 26 September 2007 - 09:46 PM

any one have any old abloy cl series or any other type ,tubular or baton keys id like to buy them for my collection

#12 MrLocks

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 12:39 AM

First of all welcome to the forum. regarding to rules about bumping in Canada, you should check rules regarding this, because its different all over.
Sandy