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Bumping without a Bump Key


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#1 lancen833

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Posted 19 May 2007 - 02:20 PM

Hey guys. I'm a recent Bump enthusiast and I discovered something I think is very interesting. I make my own bump keys, as I can't order some excellent ones from bumpkeys.us, and I recently tried a duplicated master key to see if it would fit in a master padlock. To make a long story short, it did, and while it did not unlock the lock outright, I was able to bump with it! This key was not filed at all and only the cut closest to the tip had any depth to it. (Like an 8 perhaps.0
I tried it on several other padlocks: All worked.

Also, I found a different way of bumping a key. No percussion is required. The 1 pin pull-out method method is used, but instead of a bludgeon, the key is gripped between the fingers and snapped into the hole. It seems to work just as good and there is not mushrooming on the key or denting on the lock. I'll have some videos and pictures up later.

#2 chorbats

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Posted 19 May 2007 - 06:38 PM

Can you show a video of this snapping method. I sure would like to see this.

#3 theopratr

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Posted 20 May 2007 - 02:04 AM

Search the forums for the "tough guy" method of bumping. :)

#4 lancen833

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Posted 20 May 2007 - 08:14 AM

I am familiar with the "tuff-guy" method of bumping. This is definitely not it. (Although, before I realized the snap thing I did hit it with my hands.) I can't get to my camera for the next few days, so you might have to wait for pictures/demonstration.

#5 theopratr

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Posted 20 May 2007 - 09:04 PM

What sort of lock/key are you using?

Certain locks are prone to extremely low-impact bumping, with a key that is cut correctly. I have Yale, Arrow and Kwikset keys that will literally open the lock by "snapping" the key in as you suggest, although from your description it seems like you may be on to something different.

Looking forward to a more detailed description/pictures/videos!

#6 lancen833

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Posted 21 May 2007 - 09:35 PM

Good news is that I got the camera and recorded some footage. The bad news is that the camera ran out of juice right as I finished recording, so it will have to wait until tomorrow for the actual upload. Bleh...

Just a little bit of information: The key is a duplicate of some Masterlock key that I had laying around and hadn't gotten to filing yet. It's cheap Home Depot variety. (Axxess) The locks that I use in the videos are an M1 and M3 Masterlock. 4 pins I'm pretty sure. I've also used it to bump 2 other padlocks. One and unidentifiable 3/4 pin and another Masterlock that was REALLY rusty.

If I didn't know any better, I would say that the locks were master-keyed to my key, but they are all from public places with a large enough distance between them to make that unlikely. Also, the key won't open them outright.

In the video I show myself using a few of the more conventional methods, and then the snapping. The snap is really hard to see because there is virtually no movement, but still far more that I would have with a minimal movement key. ( The key isn't filed for MM anyway...) From what I've tested, the snap seems to work best in locks that aren't incredibly smooth, (As there is no resistance) but aren't unrealistically gummy. (Because you just can't get enough force with your fingers to snap it in and torque at the same time!)

Hope this clarifies a little bit.

#7 lancen833

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 06:25 AM

Snap Bumping.

Ok, here it is. I finally got my camera ready and everything and uploaded the video to the interwebs.

#8 chorbats

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 02:19 PM

very nice, but i still dont see how you are doing it?
The force must be strong with this one!:bow:

#9 theopratr

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 03:49 PM

I couldn't get a good look at the key in the video (video is notoriously bad for keys!).

I could tell however that it was as you described... cut variably, and not necessarily to the lowest depth.

It seems to me that in your experimentation you've been lucky in finding locks that work with that key. I don't mean that they're master keyed to the lock, or what have you... just that none of the pins in any of the locks that you've tried have been lower than the cuts on your key.

The method of applying heavy tension and pushing the key in is new to me, although in theory it could work... as (multiple) top pin(s) is/are pushed above the shearline, the plug turns enough such that the bottom pin(s) can't cross it easily. The very light pressure on the key isn't anything new... a very well cut bump key will do that. But that with the tension is weird... but apparently it works in some cases.

Anyone else have any ideas?

And also, a picture of this magic snap key, s'il vous plait. :)

#10 lancen833

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Posted 24 May 2007 - 06:13 AM

Posted Image


Posted Image


I tried to get a good picture, but it was difficult. The area where the key is large enough to see clearly is out of the focusing range of my camera. I might be able to use another, more expensive one with a better lens, bu that will have to wait until tonight at the earliest.

Also, I made another movie, this time with music. (Which, upon viewing, I realized didn't translate well. My subwoofer sounds far too loud. Oh well.)

Snap Bumping II

In it I do the snap bumping and another technique that I have thus far discovered. From what I can tell, it works similar to raking with keys. Of course, I gave it the moniker of "the wiggle." Hopefully this will let you see what is going on even better.

#11 chorbats

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Posted 24 May 2007 - 10:31 PM

Dude you are a god in lock bumping. I just about broke my finger trying this out. You have my respect.:bow:

#12 lancen833

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Posted 25 May 2007 - 06:31 AM

How did you almost break your finger? If you are endangering digits, you're probably doing something wrong.

Also, although I bask in your praise, I think the real Bumping Gods are the main purveyors of this forum. Like SlickJ.

#13 lancen833

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Posted 25 May 2007 - 07:10 PM

Ironically enough, it would seem that I am not the first person to discover this. As I was cruising through some of the videos on the forum, I came upon this: http://video.google....=bump key&hl=en

Although, it kind of looks like he isn't even turning the key, which draws from the credibility.

>_>

#14 theopratr

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Posted 25 May 2007 - 09:30 PM

I've seen a similar one using a Yale key... that one is certainly suspect. Your method looks legit, although I'm still trying to work out the specifics. ;)

#15 lancen833

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Posted 26 May 2007 - 12:34 PM

Hmmm... A sudden stroke of bad luck. While my friends and I were sitting around a fire pit last night, telling stories, laughing, and enjoying ourselves, we passed around a masterlock and my bumpkey-that-isn't-quite-a-bumpkey. We tried all different styles, and due to my corruptive influence, most of them were successful. However, when it came to be my turn to do the tuff-guy 3 pin pullout, I managed to irreparably bend my key. I thought, "Ok, so this is why I'm not going to Home Depot for copies any more." Luckily, one of them knew the name of a Mom & Pop hardware store nearby that duplicated and sold keys. From what I've heard, this means a high chance of good quality the next time around. I still need to check the place out though.

#16 lancen833

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Posted 26 May 2007 - 01:33 PM

So, I finally got the chance to take some decent photos of the original key. Now you can see exactly where the madness comes from.

Posted Image

#17 theopratr

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 12:05 AM

To your next to last post... Mom & Pop have the good sense to sell ILCO-brand blanks... don't settle for anything less.

As for your key, the slopes are all conducive to bumping, but the depths are not... find a lock that takes a lower cut for one of the back cuts... if that works, you're on to something!

#18 lancen833

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 02:54 PM

Ok, I've come up against a lock that does NOT work with my key. It was in a Home Depot. I am bummed. -_-

Of course, I only gave it 2 tries because people were looking at me oddly.

#19 Roman

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Posted 05 June 2007 - 12:59 AM

I have inadvertently gotten this method to work on a kwikset lock.

with my bump key (shown in my first post, NOT the one made for pull-out), I can take the key out one click, then just push it in as slowly as i want, while putting torque on it and it opens the lock. then i can re-lock it, and while torqueing it, pull it out one notch and it opens the lock.

This is my take on it, after examining the bump-key, original and trying with different bump-keys:

The original is similar enough to your non-bump-key to where snapping it in basically pushes the pins to the shear line, where they catch. If I'm right about this, then you can unlock that any number of ways. You can pull the key out one notch, and then push it in a tiny amount, like .5 - 1.0 millimeters, and then turn the key while pulling it back out, and it will work. Or you can push it in all the way, then pull it out one notch while torqueing it and it will open.

The way this works for my kwikset is that the original key has many deep cuts and one shallow cut at the very end of the key. The general bump keys I made can push the pins to the shear line, where each of them stick and it turns. No bouncing, or sharp hit or newton's laws needed. It's basically a big coincidence that the original key was cut like that.

To confirm that, I tried it with a key that had the front peak cut down for pull-out method and it didn't work at all. Not once, whereas the others had a 100% success rate. Also, I tried it on another kwikset lock that was the opposite: many very shallow cuts and one deep one. No success.

To confirm this is what's happening with your key, you could post a pic of the original next to the "bump-key". If they're similar enough, that would explain it.

If I'm right about this, then this method wouldn't work on all similar locks. Only a few lucky ones. That's a damn shame because when I first got this to work, I was psyched. I got the lock to open with less noise than putting the key in it made.

#20 lancen833

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 06:49 PM

That could be what is going on, as I tried what you suggested and it indeed worked. Unfortunately, I have no way of comparing the original keys to my keys, as the locks were from a public place and I was only 'borrowing' them. I guess that this solves that particular mystery.