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How important are the quality of your keys?


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#1 sambob

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 04:44 PM

This may seem like kind of a stupid question, but Im asking it anyway. The majority of the questions I see asked in this forum are "Whats wrong with my keys", or some variation on that. The keys that I've made myself, look worse, are measured more incorrectly than many of the 'non-working' keys I see people posting pictures of... yet mine work.

Hell it seems to me that a bump key doesnt need to be madWhae that perfectly, that the real challenge involved in learning bumping is tension, and even maybe how to strike the key. When I first got into bumping I spent a long time fussing over my keys. But when I said "screw it" and just decided to keep trying with what I had, using different amounts of tension, different striking techniques (and different hammers), I found that eventually I could bump quite easily with practice. My keys look pretty bad looking, but I'm fairly competent at bumping most locks I've ever come across.

What do the people that are just super skilled and experienced at bumping have to say about this?

For me making bump keys has always been easy, I dont even take measurements I just do it freehand and have never had a key that doesnt work.. and they seem to work just fine!

As for my second question, when you have good technique and experience in bumping, does having a 'proper' key (like the ones sold at the website often suggested on this forum...), actually make the process much easier?

#2 theopratr

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 08:28 PM

You raise an interesting point. If a key "looks good", it doesn't guarantee it will work at all. The crude "first-attempt" varieties occasionally work quite well. This is due in part to the grooves often being cut much deeper than necessary; where insufficient depth is a common problem with well made amateur varieties. If the depths are deep, but the peaks are around the correct angle and roughly where they should be, the key's going to work... if you know how to use it. A key that looks great that's not cut low enough, not cut at the proper interval, etc. isn't going to open anything, and someone who is using poor technique won't get anything open with a perfect bump key.

That being said, a nice set of professionally produced keys never hurts to have, as they are not expensive and will greatly help the quality of any keys you attempt to make in the future, as they demonstrate exactly what you need to produce. Additionally, if you can get things open with a home brew, the well cut varieties will make you wet yourself.

#3 Customer Support

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Posted 14 May 2007 - 06:13 PM

I couldn't agree more with theopratr. The two aspects of a key that matter most are the spacing and the depth. If you just 'eye ball' a key the chances of a screw up go through the roof. If you've had good success with a home brew key, and you've used no guides or other keys then bravo!


It would be nice if you could upload a picture of the key to this forum. Head to www.tinypic.com if you need a place to host it ; )

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#4 BLK

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Posted 14 May 2007 - 09:04 PM

I have made dozens of bump keys from scratch, usually from a copy of the key that fits the lock I want to bump or at least the same keyway. I have made some really s:furious3:tty bump keys, but they all have worked. Some I have had to file more to be able to open other locks with the same keyway, but that just makes a better bump key that works on more locks. I do not have any store bought/made bump keys, but the ones I have work.

Sambob, you have hit the bump key on the bow with your post. :bow:
Bump it to the next level.

#5 sambob

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Posted 26 May 2007 - 09:00 PM

Well I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks so.

#6 bentpick

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Posted 26 May 2007 - 10:43 PM

Correct technique can overcome a crappy key...I made my first bump key in 5 minutes and bumped my first lock on the third try...Good technique + a good key is even better. A great key + crappy technique may mean not ever bumping a lock...a common mistake is too much tension + knocking the living hell out of the poor key :eek: . A key should never bend, break etc. The small pins that need to be bumped up a micrometer don't need the force of a hammer bludgeoning them to death. Its all about finesse...not power. A 4 month old embryo has the arm strength to get the job done.

Anyway, I need to get back to breaking into this bank.........
Bump on!!!!

#7 theopratr

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Posted 26 May 2007 - 11:55 PM

A key should never bend, break etc. The small pins that need to be bumped up a micrometer don't need the force of a hammer bludgeoning them to death.

An excellent point... a well made bump key need not be forced. As the actual force needed to "jump" the top pins is so minimal, if you're doing things right you can literally tap the key into the lock and have it work. So (!) to any new bumpers... the least force possible, and increase until you get it to work for you.

#8 MrLocks

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 11:59 PM

Quality of key is the most important in the whole lock bumping process. Key should be filed well with nice gaps and valleys.
Sandy

#9 Kaylee

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 02:14 AM

here are some pin tumbler locks that say they protect against bumping.


Toronto Locksmith Available 24/7

247torontolocksmith.com


#10 LogiGoi

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Posted 13 December 2015 - 10:49 AM

Quality would really be important because what if you were always using your bump key and then the time came when it became brittle or something like that???then as you bump it, it broke then there would be a possibility that what if some parts of the were left inside the lock...



#11 TanVanMan

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 05:57 AM

This may seem like kind of a stupid question, but Im asking it anyway. The majority of the questions I see asked in this forum are "Whats wrong with my keys", or some variation on that. The keys that I've made myself, look worse, are measured more incorrectly than many of the 'non-working' keys I see people posting pictures of... yet mine work.

Hell it seems to me that a bump key doesnt need to be madWhae that perfectly, that the real challenge involved in learning bumping is tension, and even maybe how to strike the key. When I first got into bumping I spent a long time fussing over my keys. But when I said "screw it" and just decided to keep trying with what I had, using different amounts of tension, different striking techniques (and different hammers), I found that eventually I could bump quite easily with practice. My keys look pretty bad looking, but I'm fairly competent at bumping most locks I've ever come across.

What do the people that are just super skilled and experienced at bumping have to say about this?

For me making bump keys has always been easy, I dont even take measurements I just do it freehand and have never had a key that doesnt work.. and they seem to work just fine!

As for my second question, when you have good technique and experience in bumping, does having a 'proper' key (like the ones sold at the website often suggested on this forum...), actually make the process much easier?

 

Quality is always an important factor to consider in creating or buying bump keys. It will definitely affect the "performance" of key bumping. But for me I think practice is more important.Some keys are not made from quality materials but still works well. 



#12 TanVanMan

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Posted 29 December 2015 - 09:08 PM

This may seem like kind of a stupid question, but Im asking it anyway. The majority of the questions I see asked in this forum are "Whats wrong with my keys", or some variation on that. The keys that I've made myself, look worse, are measured more incorrectly than many of the 'non-working' keys I see people posting pictures of... yet mine work.

Hell it seems to me that a bump key doesnt need to be madWhae that perfectly, that the real challenge involved in learning bumping is tension, and even maybe how to strike the key. When I first got into bumping I spent a long time fussing over my keys. But when I said "screw it" and just decided to keep trying with what I had, using different amounts of tension, different striking techniques (and different hammers), I found that eventually I could bump quite easily with practice. My keys look pretty bad looking, but I'm fairly competent at bumping most locks I've ever come across.

What do the people that are just super skilled and experienced at bumping have to say about this?

For me making bump keys has always been easy, I dont even take measurements I just do it freehand and have never had a key that doesnt work.. and they seem to work just fine!

As for my second question, when you have good technique and experience in bumping, does having a 'proper' key (like the ones sold at the website often suggested on this forum...), actually make the process much easier?

 

For me, as long as it works and its durable. It doesn't matter if it doesn't look good. I don't buy or make a bump key for a display. I need to use them and of course it should work :-)



#13 lillylockpicker

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 10:40 AM

For me, as long as it works and its durable. It doesn't matter if it doesn't look good. I don't buy or make a bump key for a display. I need to use them and of course it should work :-)

You certainly pointed out the most important thing in having a bump key. It's for bumping and not for display so the what matters is the quality. you would even need to be discrete about having a bump key because you might be questioned by the authority if they found out that you have a bump key.



#14 TanVanMan

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 09:25 PM

You certainly pointed out the most important thing in having a bump key. It's for bumping and not for display so the what matters is the quality. you would even need to be discrete about having a bump key because you might be questioned by the authority if they found out that you have a bump key.

Right. But as long as you have the permit it's ok. :-)



#15 lillylockpicker

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 01:54 AM

Right. But as long as you have the permit it's ok. :-)

what permit? hahaha. but we are all aware that not all bump key users have a permit. well as long as you use it with good purpose.



#16 redcity

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 05:22 AM

Right. But as long as you have the permit it's ok. :-)

Well, you have raised a good point here, but i am really confused thinking about "What will be the grants given to you by that permit?", is it like you can bump any lock or your own locks or locks of some specific company?, hahahahhaha that permit thing is out of date in case of bumping wink.png



#17 TanVanMan

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Posted 17 January 2016 - 04:55 AM

Well, you have raised a good point here, but i am really confused thinking about "What will be the grants given to you by that permit?", is it like you can bump any lock or your own locks or locks of some specific company?, hahahahhaha that permit thing is out of date in case of bumping wink.png

Permission I mean. As long as it is your own lock or you have the permission from the owner of the lock. That's what I meant ;-)



#18 redcity

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Posted 17 January 2016 - 11:39 AM

Permission I mean. As long as it is your own lock or you have the permission from the owner of the lock. That's what I meant ;-)

Ok, i got it , sorry for the misunderstanding, i thought of it like a permit you take for opening a pizza shop or things like that :)


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