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Where to find other bump keys?


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#1 ThomasNielsen

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 04:24 AM

Hello.. and thx for a very interesting forum..
i have been interested in bumping about a yeah.. my "unlimited" search for bump keys that work on other than "typical US brands", gave me no clue where to order.. i live in sweden.. these are the brands that i would like to have bumpkeys for: ASSA,KABA, ABLOY, SOLIO, FAS, EVVA, DORMA, BEWATOR, RCO, TEKA, ABUS, EXPERT, LARM, DICO, and PLUS.

an related question: How do you guyz do research about what brands to order.. can you just go to the local locksmith and ask which 10 brands he sell most of ? :confused:

#2 theopratr

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 09:11 AM

In the states, the question of what to order is pretty simple... 90% of our front doors use one of two keys. In Sweden, as you mention, it's a different story.

Despite the fact that you have a greater variety of locks and keys, the majority of them can still be bumped. The lock must be a regular pin tumbler mechanism to allow the lock to be bumped. In Europe, many of the locks are just Yales or clones, meaning that one key will open most locks.

Peterson Manufacturing sells some bump keys, but only to locksmiths or other security professionals. They sell a 5-pin EVVA key, 5 and 6-pin ASSA keys, a 5-pin ESLA EV-3D key and a 5-pin AZBE AZ-1D. They are rather strict about the credentials required for sale, and I'm not sure if they ship internationally. It may be worth a shot to have your locksmith order them from Peterson for you.

And you could always just go to your locksmith and tell him about your interest in the subject; talk to him about what keys are most common, and ask him to tell you about bump keys. If you're an upstanding character, he may even cut you a few. Even if he doesn't, knowing which keys are the most common is half the battle... once you know, you can file down your own keys.

#3 Chucklz

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 01:52 AM

"In Europe, many of the locks are just Yales or clones, meaning that one key will open most locks."
While Universal blanks do exist, you cannot simply lump all of Europe together. For example, consider the UK, and all of the BS Lever locks there. Then consider brands like GEGE, Cisa, Ruko, ASSA, KABA, ABLOY, DOM et al. Not only will a "universal blank" not fit many if not all of the locks from these manufacturers, not all of these locks are bumpable. Oh, and Yale has a wide variety of keyways, so even if all the locks happened to be Yale clones, you would still need a variety of keys.

#4 theopratr

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 09:14 AM

I'm not sure what you don't understand. If it's Yale brand, and it takes a Y1 or Y2, a Y2 will do the job. If it's not Yale brand but uses the same keyway, the Y2 will still do the job. And yes, there are other brands... quite a few of them. But Yale is absolutely by far the most common keyway around, regardless of brand name. This comes from five years of experience of living between the UK, France and Germany.

#5 Chucklz

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 11:02 PM

I understand perfectly. The "universal" keyblanks popular in the UK and western Europe are often thought of as a Yale keyway. A Y1 or Y2 will NOT do even all of the Yales in common use in the UK. I submit the X5 as an example. During my time in Austria/Bavaria the most common locks were Dom and EVVA. None of the Yale keyways would have been suitable for the vast majority of cylinders I encountered. And the UK? BS3681 lever locks are unbumpable of course. Of course the vast majority of cylinders there can be fit with a Yale key. But the OP asked about locks in Sweden. From the list he gave, many of the listed manufacturers produce locks that cannot be compromised by bumping. Additional locks have sidebar requirements that will most likely not be found by ordering a bumpkey online. Oh and don't forget that the majority of locks in this area of the world are 7 pin locks. A 6 pin bumpkey cut for the minimal motion method will of course bump a 7 pin lock, but I do not think these are currently available, now that multi-pick has taken down their bump keys.

#6 theopratr

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Posted 02 May 2007 - 12:06 AM

Yale does have a plethora of operational keyways - I only offer the 999 series as an example of the most common. When I was in Bremen, the majority of the Yale series locks I ran into were compatible, although many were not. The tendencies, as you mention, vary greatly region to region, and I admit to oversimplifying.

Given the European attitude toward locks and their security needs, one will find a much greater variety of "common" keyways in use, and more often run into relatively high security locks that are very difficult or impossible to bump.

I'm glad that you mentioned the extra pin gained when using minimal movement, as many of the locks are seven pins, and bump keys for these are rare birds indeed. I tend to grind the tip of the key at an angle to match that of the peaks on the key, thus shortening it for minimal movement while at the same time optimizing the spacing and angle as to catch that first pin without a problem. It certainly helps when you run into those seven pin systems.

#7 jonta

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 10:36 AM

I'm also interested in the keys mentioned in the first post. Moastly ASSA. Will you be selling ASSA keys anytime?

#8 MrLocks

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 12:43 AM

I'm not sure what you don't understand. If it's Yale brand, and it takes a Y1 or Y2, a Y2 will do the job. If it's not Yale brand but uses the same keyway, the Y2 will still do the job. And yes, there are other brands... quite a few of them. But Yale is absolutely by far the most common keyway around, regardless of brand name. This comes from five years of experience of living between the UK, France and Germany.

I agree with you that, mostly Yale is commonly used keyway in most of the locks.
Sandy