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master combination padlock


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#1 bumper183

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Posted 12 April 2007 - 04:00 PM

I am interested in buying, or making a key for a master comination padlock. As i'm sure most of you know, it is a combination lock, with a keyhole in the back. any feedback on this matter would be greatly appreciated.

#2 PhreeX

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Posted 12 April 2007 - 04:23 PM

Having made my original set of keys (the file method using a blank) after seeing the deomnstration at DefCon 14 this last year (in the lockpicking village) I would imagine that you would use the same method ... if you don't have the master key you may have to take the lock to a locksmith to get an idea what type of keyblank you need ... I know the type of lock/key you are refering too as in High School we had to use the school provided combo locks and they had a master key on the back .. it was a TINY key, not like the padlock key sold off bumpkey.us, it's a tiny key ... those little luggage padlocks seem to have the same size keys so that could be a starting point ... tyhen again, if you go to a locksmith with a combolock with a master key, most locksmiths know those are used namely by places like school, gyms, and other places where it would not be in their best intrest to help you with any means of comprimising said lock (out high school padlocks even had the schools initials ingrave on the back, taken to any locksmith within a few counties and they would have probably laughed and said to get out of their store..

Now the good nes is those little mater keyholes are EASY to pick ... but in getting a bump key you qwould probably have to make your own ... just my best guess, I don't have my old high school padlock that was over a decade ago) so I can't play with it and give you any idea what type of key may work best...

Others?

//p

#3 sniper101

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Posted 12 April 2007 - 05:52 PM

If your main interest is getting the lock open, shims work excellent on master combination padlocks. If you specificaly want to bump the lock, then I would do what PhreeX reccomended and file your own key down. Your only concern would be getting a blank for it. If you have the original key to it, then you can make a copy of that possibly and make a key out of that. I hope that helps.

#4 theopratr

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Posted 12 April 2007 - 09:19 PM

I'm not sure which blank it is either; one possibility that comes to mind is an M2 blank, although I'm not sure. For reference, the name of the most common Master Combination lock with the keyhole on the back is the Master Series 1525.

IMHO, I wouldn't waste my time with a bump key for that lock. The lock is so small, and of such low security standards, that the main lock can be bypassed by a shim in a few seconds, or the override can be picked in a few more. The bump key would probably end up damaging the lock, as it's not really meant for frequent use, and the bump key could be awkward to utilize.

#5 bryjorrin

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Posted 03 November 2007 - 10:36 AM

Sorry to gravedig, but I have to say this:

I dont know what keyblank it is, but I know that recently, master has been designing the metal around the shackle a bit tighter, making shimming a decent amount harder, and actually impossible in a few cases. In my case, this doesnt matter, since I am a high school senior, all of my classmates are using their 3 year old locks with the looser shackle.

(But none of this matters to me, since a janitor always lets me borrow the real key. He knows I can pick locks and figures why make me waste the time if I'll get in anyways. Also, he reffered me to this site. :) )

Anyways, I have trouble picking these locks, mostly because their keyways are so small. It takes me several attempts to get it (Especially when the lock is actually on something, it's quite awkward.)

Any tips?

Also, if anyone wants some of these locks, I can get them for you, but I cannot get you the combination. Most of the ones I have are donations from past graduates. There are ways that can get you the combination, but I find that those "Reduce to 55 different combination" methods are a little harder on the combination locks that have a key override. For some reson, they tend to go past the numbers a little bit when you are pulling up on the shackle, making it hard to tell which number is in the middle.

#6 theopratr

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Posted 03 November 2007 - 06:12 PM

I don't have much for you in terms of better ways to pick these guys... the locks are tiny, but not of high security, so simply raking them is generally my approach. Scaling your tools down for the lock also helps, i.e. a smaller tension wrench and a miniature C-rake.

If you want to elucidate combinations, you can do it (carefully) just by peering into the lock through the open shackle. A penlight helps, and an understanding of how disk tumbler locks work is a must. By being able to see the physical tumblers, you can quickly determine where they "pick up", and thus figure out the combination quickly with a bit of trial an error. If you are being allowed to keep old locks that you remove, this may help in their resale.

#7 ChicagoLocks

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 03:11 AM

If your main interest is getting the lock open, shims work excellent on master combination padlocks. If you specificaly want to bump the lock, then I would do what PhreeX reccomended and file your own key down. Your only concern would be getting a blank for it. If you have the original key to it, then you can make a copy of that possibly and make a key out of that. I hope that helps.

Thats true, shims are the perfect choice for master combination padlocks as I also used that for many times.
Sandy