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#1 austin_g93

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 01:08 AM

:smile: Ok, I understand that bumping doesn't work on car locks. I have been locked out of my car way too many times and I am getting tired of paying the locksmith or the auto repair company to fix my window.:biggrin: I was wondering if anyone knew of a relatively easy way to open a locked car. I would like some suggestions on what to buy and what not. Thanks in advance if you can help!!
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#2 Customer Support

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 01:11 AM

Have you tested the trustworthy method of using a slim jim?

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#3 austin_g93

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 01:24 AM

Ya i don't know how to use a slimjim or how to even practice, does anyone know?

#4 Customer Support

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 02:09 AM

Doing a quick search: http://www.google.co...lient=firefox-a

Returned MANY useful links \ guides. Take a peek. :drinking:

James K. - Lead Support
For Order specific questions please use the 'contact us' link at the top of our store.


#5 BLK

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 05:09 AM

:smile: Ok, I understand that bumping doesn't work on car locks. I have been locked out of my car way too many times and I am getting tired of paying the locksmith or the auto repair company to fix my window.:biggrin: I was wondering if anyone knew of a relatively easy way to open a locked car. I would like some suggestions on what to buy and what not. Thanks in advance if you can help!!


G: You are the locksmith's dream customer/worst nightmare. Locally, you would be $50-120 easy money depending on what part of town and time of day you called. That is the dream customer part, very easy money. Now the nightmare part: no training, slim jim in hand, damage to door seals/window seals, damage to paint, damage to internal works of the doors, warped doors, scratched/ripped/marred interior, etc. No locksmith in his/her right mind would touch a car that the owner/driver has obviously damaged without a signed, witnessed, noterized release that legal counsel for all parties involved have signed that states that the damage was already there before I got here and I am in no way responsible for that damage. This is why I don't do cars at all. Easy money, very big headache.

Solutions: 1. Think before you close your locked car door. Ask yourself, "Are my keys in my hand or pocket?" 2. Carry a spare key in your wallet.

One other thought: Where would you keep the slim jim? In your locked car that you can't get into because you locked the keys inside and the slim jim is in under the seat or in the trunk? Also, in most states if you were stopped by an officer of the law and they tricked you into letting them search your car, you would be found guilty of possessing a burglary tool. Not good in any state.
Bump it to the next level.

#6 BLK

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 05:41 AM

G: You are the locksmith's dream customer/worst nightmare. Locally, you would be $50-120 easy money depending on what part of town and time of day you called.


That being said, it still costs the locksmith about $500.00 for a good, basic set of car opening tools. Also the drive time, cost of fuel, wear and tear on the his vehicle, etc. to get to wherever you are locked out of your car. If the locksmith also provides key making, door lock repair, ignition switch repair/replacement services, the initial cost to buy the equipment to service a wide variety of vehicles is in the ten$ of thou$and$ of dollar$. It takes a lot of $50.00 calls to recoup that investment and turn a profit.

I gotta stand up for my locksmith peeps.
Bump it to the next level.

#7 theopratr

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 08:30 AM

Get a copy of your key made and keep it in your wallet. All of your lockout problems are solved. Slim jims, jigglers, model specific try-out keys, automotive picks... all viable solutions, and all are kept in your car, making them absolutely useless. These tools are generally expensive, if they are of a sufficient quality to actually work, and a copy of a key costs less than two dollars.

Many people have reservations about keeping keys in their wallet, especially automotive keys, because they are so large. I find that it helps to shave off a large portion of the head of the key, making extended storage in a wallet more comfortable.

And if for some reason this information is not sufficient, there are other ways to get into a car. Bricks work well, but if you want to be classy, I suggest the "Brooklyn Method" - a steel plate, rubber banded to your elbow, concealed under a shirt, applied with force to the car window.

#8 sniper101

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 10:24 AM

If you get locked out of your car alot, keeping a spare in your wallet if probably the best option. If you ever feel the need to get into someone elses car, then auto jigglers or tryout keys are probably your best option. They are probably the closest thing to bumping for cars. They work by "jiggling" the key while trying to turn it at the same time, and with enough practice just as in bumping you can get the skill down. They are relatively inexpensive too, ranging from $25 to over $100. These prices are based on the amount of keys your getting, and some keys are made for specific makes of cars.

#9 bumber

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 11:50 PM

you can bump cars that have pin locks all u do id make a double key made as a bump(or single if need be) Ive only done the double 2 times and tried about ten thousand times. so it can be done just u probly wont do it.
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#10 sniper101

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 05:44 AM

I dont think you can bump car locks, because they use a different type of lock style(I think they are wafer locks, but not positive) rather then tumbler pin locks(which can be bumped).

#11 theopratr

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 01:00 PM

Once again, with the exception of some Ford vehicles, almost all cars use some variation of a wafer system, which is does not lend itself to bumping. Some newer, high end cars use completely different systems with grooves cut into the side of the key, and these can also not be bumped.

#12 MrLocks

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 02:47 AM

you can bump cars that have pin locks all u do id make a double key made as a bump(or single if need be) Ive only done the double 2 times and tried about ten thousand times. so it can be done just u probly wont do it.

Yeah that's true but I think most car door locks have different structures and it cant be bumped by bump keys as it doesn't have pins inside that.
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#13 LockPickIt

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 04:55 AM

 

Works all the time for me. At least. And to my friends.



#14 redcity

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Posted 11 December 2015 - 10:04 PM

If you get locked out of your car alot, keeping a spare in your wallet if probably the best option. If you ever feel the need to get into someone elses car, then auto jigglers or tryout keys are probably your best option. They are probably the closest thing to bumping for cars. They work by "jiggling" the key while trying to turn it at the same time, and with enough practice just as in bumping you can get the skill down. They are relatively inexpensive too, ranging from $25 to over $100. These prices are based on the amount of keys your getting, and some keys are made for specific makes of cars.

Some sensible thoughts, thats what my uncle used to say me all the time 



#15 TanVanMan

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Posted 11 December 2015 - 10:32 PM

 

Works all the time for me. At least. And to my friends.

Won't it damage the car window? Nice video. Thanks for sharing



#16 redcity

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Posted 15 December 2015 - 10:46 PM

Won't it damage the car window? Nice video. Thanks for sharing

A lot, when done by an inexperienced person, it's better to practice it on your old wheeler 



#17 TanVanMan

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 03:56 PM

Won't it damage the car window? Nice video. Thanks for sharing

 

 

A lot, when done by an inexperienced person, it's better to practice it on your old wheeler 

 

An extra key will be much better then. I'd say you better keep a duplicate in your wallet or somewhere you always bring with you.



#18 LockPickIt

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Posted 17 December 2015 - 11:54 PM

Won't it damage the car window? Nice video. Thanks for sharing

Yeah it will damage the car so be careful but doesn't matter if you'd use the method sparingly



#19 LogiGoi

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Posted 20 December 2015 - 11:04 AM

I've seen many videos about using a string to unlock a car...This will actually work to most of the car doors just don't use it illegally...hehe



#20 TanVanMan

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Posted 24 December 2015 - 07:24 AM

Get a copy of your key made and keep it in your wallet. All of your lockout problems are solved. Slim jims, jigglers, model specific try-out keys, automotive picks... all viable solutions, and all are kept in your car, making them absolutely useless. These tools are generally expensive, if they are of a sufficient quality to actually work, and a copy of a key costs less than two dollars.

Many people have reservations about keeping keys in their wallet, especially automotive keys, because they are so large. I find that it helps to shave off a large portion of the head of the key, making extended storage in a wallet more comfortable.

And if for some reason this information is not sufficient, there are other ways to get into a car. Bricks work well, but if you want to be classy, I suggest the "Brooklyn Method" - a steel plate, rubber banded to your elbow, concealed under a shirt, applied with force to the car window.

I agree with having a copy of your key would be the best thing to do. And right, those tools are useless if they are all kept in your car unless you're in your own garage and those tools are there.