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HOWTO: File Down Tip And Shoulder


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#21 bbrain

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 08:47 AM

OK - so now you've got some hot new bump keys but have been told you need to file down the Tip and Shoulder.

Well, your in luck, as this process is very simple.

We need a few things first:

1 Metal File (Square\Flat) - Hardware store, Leatherman, Gerber
1 Pair of pliers \ vise (only suggested for safety, not needed)
1 Bump Key to file



Here is what we'll be filing down. The parts in red need to be filed. Read on.
Posted Image


Step 1)
Put the key in the vise so the tip is sticking out.

Step 2) File .5 -to 1 Millimeter off of the tip.
This allows the key to go a bit further in once you bump it.

-Remove the key and flip it around so the shoulder is now visible.-

Step 3) File .5 to 1 Millimeter off of the shoulder
This allows the key to go a bit further in once you bump it.

Notes:
The tip is actually the striking slope of the pin that is the deepest in the lock. Shave off enough so that the back pin will sit nicely and raise when the key goes in just like all the others.

Be sure to remove any barbs \ spurs from filing the keys - they are sharp!



That's it. You've got yourself a bump key now. Be sure not to mail it through the mail as this is a federal crime.


Notes: The image is from dpcproductions.com. No Copyright Indicated.


Hi,

AFAIK only need to file, when you use "minimal movement method", so if you using the "pull-back method", not need any filing

#22 unkellsam

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 05:17 PM

What about the front fin? Most of the bump keys that I have have the first fin at the front longer than the other ones. Should I leave it as is or file that down to the height of all the others? I don't know if this is the reason but my locksmith has been filing down the front fins and most of my keys havnt been working.

#23 george728

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 01:29 AM

hey guys the tip should be filed .5 or i base mine on my thumb nail
the back should be atleast 1mm to give the key room to slid forward
Knowledge is Power

#24 ropeadope

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 03:57 AM

Thanks for the guide. I'd really like to see a picture of a real key before and after, that'd be great.

#25 Kristic

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 05:52 AM

Thanks for the guide. I'd really like to see a picture of a real key before and after, that'd be great.


Look around, I'm willing to bet that 1/3 of topics here are of real life keys and there cuts

#26 ropeadope

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 09:17 PM

Well mainly i'm confused as to where the shoulder exactly is on all kinds of different keys. The one in the picture is obvious to where the shoulder is, but some other key designs aren't so obvious.

#27 digitxm

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 09:44 PM

the shoulder will always be where the key connects with the lock and is prevented from going in further (on the top of the key)

#28 ropeadope

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 07:56 PM

Ok, i kinda get it. Do you have to file both the top and bottom shoulder?

I bought a set of bump keys here, I'll have to file them for them to work right? I've read a couple of posts (one on this page) saying no filing is needed unless you're doing the minimal movement method? Thanks again.

#29 digitxm

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 08:23 AM

generally you need only file the top shoulder. Check the lock you are working with, if the bottom shoulder gets in the way, then you can trim it a bit, but it is the top that is important. If you are doing the pull back method (pulling it out one pin) you do not need to file.

#30 ropeadope

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 05:35 PM

Ok, thanks :). But don't all keys need to be filed down to use as bump keys? It's illegal to mail bump keys right? I thought that's why they all needed to be filed down at the tip and should

#31 digitxm

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 07:09 PM

if you want to do the pull out method (where you pull out the key one click and then bump) you dont need to file at all. If you are going to do the more popular (and many would say more effective) minimal movement method, you will need to file the keys. It is illegal to mail keys that have the tips and shoulders modified.

remember to copy the keys before filing (file the copy) that way you can recopy in case you screw up filing.

#32 warwagon

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 04:59 PM

OK, for the nOObs (boobs), such as I, at least to bumping, is it possible to get the most experienced person on the site, to take the most popular keys (Kwikset, Schlage, etc.) and make a before and after sticky on the subject of where and how much to file, on the particular key, if you were going to file.

I have seen the generic drawing, which is good, but people are new, such as I, and unsure.

Flame me if you will.

It's just there are ALOT of questions about this.

If I knew what I was doing, I would tackle it. I have a camera that could take the pictures clearly. BUT again, I am a nOOb at this, also and I just ordered my keys Thursday.

#33 Master Cutter

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 05:26 PM

We just don't have these problems in the UK. We lose the shoulder altogether (this helps eliminate tell-tale 'bump=bump', that little dent above the lock entrance) as well as give the key a little bit of horizontal movement, which can mean the difference between the lock popping open or not. It's these variations of movement and angle that I exploit with my technique. I use a technique familiar to (and therefore named after) planishing (which you do on metal, google it), the bump-hammer (I use a LOXWAT) swings at the key in an arc, just clipping the key at one of three places, the top third, the middle and the bottom third (see pics below) and then continues on through the arc shape, barely clipping it. Ask yourself - "How much energy does it take to move a few mm of brass pin?". Each angle of approach causes the key to perform a different little dance in the lock, variations are what you want when what you're doing isn't working. More advanced is to use one of the three hitting-points I've identified (you can keep splitting these points, I have a lock that will ONLY go if I 'clip' it on the bottom half of the top third, the second sixth down as it were) and then variate the amount of 'edge' you give it. I'd say you have about a 90 degree range from where to strike. This needs a pic, I'll do it now....here's a pic, it's basically the horizontal range from which you can strike your key. Sometimes, coming from a quite obtuse angle, the bump-hammer actually performs the task of turning the key too. Some locks I can bump like this almost everytime, with no seperate pressure applied. Of course you can go wider, all I'm trying to illustrate is the various angled available both horizontally and vertically and the product of those axis. For instance, you might have success coming at a lock from 6 inches away from the lock, six inches above it, and four inches away from it. Mime those measurements now and you'll see what I mean. Coming atthe key in an arc opens up all these and more possibilities.. Here's the pic (I just knocked it up - can u tell?)
Posted Image

In the other diagram I've tried to show the most successful technique I know for the standard 'horizontal back-hitting' where you come straight at the key. Think back to Newtons Cradle (as popularised by the desk-top toy of swinging ball-bearings) and the movement of the ball bearing as it hits the other, the energy is immediately transmitted to the next ball-bearing, it's the same in pool, hit the ball in the middle and it stuns still. Your bump-hammer should do the same. You don't want to 'push' the key at all. To remedy this, I stop the swing of my arm/hand and lett he bump hammer continue the last few inches, loose in my hand (by loosening my grip at the last second) the hammer continues on , the metal flexing slightlybut most of the movement coming frommy loosening grip - you can do this with a screwdriver, breadknife etc but it aint as easy). When it hits it it stops dead and there's absolutley NO 'push'. Don't forget, you're only trying to move a little bit of brass a few mm, just like the planishing tchnique as well, you barely need to clip it.
here's the pics

Posted Image

Regards

Master cutter


#34 skip 2 my lou

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Posted 26 January 2007 - 10:33 PM

I'm new to bumping. My first attempt was a no name padlock similar to the master m1. Regular master keys fit the lock, but I can't pop it.

The only markings on the lock are

China
40MM

( On the locks loop "hardened" is stamped. )

Any ideas???

#35 BLK

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Posted 28 January 2007 - 05:41 AM

I'm new to bumping. My first attempt was a no name padlock similar to the master m1. Regular master keys fit the lock, but I can't pop it.

The only markings on the lock are

China
40MM

( On the locks loop "hardened" is stamped. )

Any ideas???


A little more torque on the key and a little harder on the thwack. You really do have to turn the key harder and hit the key harder to get these cheap locks to open.
Bump it to the next level.

#36 The*Q*

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 03:53 PM

if you want to do the pull out method (where you pull out the key one click and then bump) you dont need to file at all. If you are going to do the more popular (and many would say more effective) minimal movement method, you will need to file the keys. It is illegal to mail keys that have the tips and shoulders modified.

remember to copy the keys before filing (file the copy) that way you can recopy in case you screw up filing.


Okay, for a noob here, can you explain the difference between the methods? "Pullout" "minimal movement"?? Please explain.

#37 C0wT1pp3r

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 03:03 PM

this is rather useful for making bump keys

#38 bumber

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Posted 28 March 2007 - 01:18 PM

either way the cutter WILL follow EXACTLY what you put in it ive got one to cut a blank with a pick tip also one with a file insted of peaks!!

#39 bumber

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Posted 28 March 2007 - 01:19 PM

that was for the last post on the 1st page sorry if it makes no sense here LOL:)

#40 JshLnsctt

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 04:48 PM

Could someone please explain what exactly the minimal move. method is to me, and why you only cut back one of the two shoulders, thanks.