Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Making keys...


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 sgt-spam

sgt-spam

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 26 February 2007 - 07:29 PM

I ordered the 11 key set, and shortly after, locks of various make from eBay.

Most of the locks came today, and the only ones that fit a key from my set are the Schlage.

I'm interested in the Yale and Arrow cylinders that came today, especially because the Yale and Arrow keys in my set don't come close to fitting.

Since two keys were included with each cylinder, I'll go ahead and start filing...

On to the question: Do you prefer a triangular or square file? What size file should I look for?

Some posts indicate a triangular file has a more aggressive slope. What difference will I notice when practicing with a triangle-filed key versus a square-filed key?


Thanks.


[edit: I've since determined that my Arrow cylinder can be bumped with the SC20 key. It doesn't look like the peaks line up exactly when comparing the SC20 to the actual key, but I've opened it twice out of a number of tries. I've got the tension down for the Schlage, but this is definitely different... :)]

#2 BLK

BLK

    Pure Genius

  • Members
  • 321 posts

Posted 26 February 2007 - 09:02 PM

I prefer a round file with a fine cut. The coarse files take off too much metal and leave a ragged edge. Round files make a key that moves past the pins with ease. You are less apt to get slopes that are to steep to move past the pins. If you decide to use a triangle or flat file, be sure to keep the slopes no steeper than 45 degrees.

Just my preference.
Bump it to the next level.

#3 sgt-spam

sgt-spam

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 07 March 2007 - 07:10 AM

A small update...

I'm getting the hang of the Arrow cylinder, and it's bumping more frequently, but it's not nearly as easy as the Schlage. A Kwikset cylinder also arrived, and it's as easy as the Schlage, IMHO.

I went ahead and used a small round file to make a key for my Yale cylinder. Surprisingly, it bumped on the first try! I was shocked... Especially since this was my first attempt at making a key. The key is a little stiff going in and out, and after examining the key, it's obvious to why (well, obvious after lurking for a while).

Anyway, images of the keys are below....


Thanks!

Posted Image

#4 Bump123

Bump123

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts

Posted 07 March 2007 - 07:49 AM

I prefer a round file with a fine cut. The coarse files take off too much metal and leave a ragged edge. Round files make a key that moves past the pins with ease. You are less apt to get slopes that are to steep to move past the pins. If you decide to use a triangle or flat file, be sure to keep the slopes no steeper than 45 degrees.

Just my preference.


Do you have any pictures of your filed keys using a round file? Or the size of the file? I've tried it a few times with no luck it always kinda rolls off where i'm supposed to be filing..

I have personally found that using a perfectly square file, and putting it in a vise, and only filing in 1 direction almost will give you a perfect key..

#5 Ronny

Ronny

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 32 posts

Posted 15 April 2011 - 10:51 PM

I prefer a round file with a fine cut. The coarse files take off too much metal and leave a ragged edge. Round files make a key that moves past the pins with ease. You are less apt to get slopes that are to steep to move past the pins. If you decide to use a triangle or flat file, be sure to keep the slopes no steeper than 45 degrees.


Just my preference.

I agree with you on that, round file with fine cut is also my preference. it make the whole process quite easy.