Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

What key do arcade cabines use?


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 bimtly

bimtly

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 21 February 2007 - 10:40 AM

I reckon a lot of people would have undoubtedly dreamt about this...

http://en.wikipedia..../Arcade_cabinet

...and if you hadn't yet and were born 70s/80s/90s before a lot of arcade places became extinct to home entertainment consoles, I bet you are now.

Can this be done?
Key types?

I am almost drooling at the thought of opening the door and flicking the tab/button over and over to bump those credits up

#2 theopratr

theopratr

    The Wise One

  • Members
  • 454 posts

Posted 21 February 2007 - 02:43 PM

I'm sure a number of people have also drooled over the idea of opening these machines up, although discussing breaking and entering on a public forum is hardly appropriate.

#3 Customer Support

Customer Support

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 753 posts

Posted 21 February 2007 - 09:58 PM

I'm sure a number of people have also drooled over the idea of opening these machines up, although discussing breaking and entering on a public forum is hardly appropriate.


Once again, I agree with theopratr. If you were to, say, own the machines in question there wouldn't be a problem... but actually bumping someone else's game up might cause a few problems.

It's been a while since i've worked on any type of arcade console and can't recall what type of locks the majority of them use... if they use a normal pin tumbler locking system buying \ creating a bump key should not be a problem at all.

James K. - Lead Support
For Order specific questions please use the 'contact us' link at the top of our store.


#4 bimtly

bimtly

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 21 February 2007 - 10:09 PM

Naturally I am only drooling at the prospect of tricking my close friend who owns one and likes to rob me when we are drunk in his backyard and of course having a backup to open my own should I buy some later in life. :D

#5 theopratr

theopratr

    The Wise One

  • Members
  • 454 posts

Posted 21 February 2007 - 11:10 PM

If the machine in question is a machine for private use, then I humbly retract my quip about the legality of opening such a machine. It would be easier to identify the key needed to open it if you posted a photo of the key way. There is no standard blank that those machines use, the range goes anywhere from a bolt-on padlock up to tubular locks, depending on who made it and when. I think the majority of the older ones where single or double wafer locks though. (In the case, picking is your only option, bumping is no good on wafer locks.)

#6 bimtly

bimtly

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 22 February 2007 - 04:29 AM

I think the one my friend has and a majority I remember in the early and mid 90s used the following type...(fairly high resolution so I will just link rather than bb code them)

http://img490.images...ss372410to3.jpg

Although I have looked around and these also seem popular

http://img482.images...21/ss315gu9.jpg
http://img482.images.../ss37279xp9.jpg

Im not exactly sure what type he has but presumably one of these because I've never seen a padlock on the thing, although as you say he may have wafer locks.

What is the official name for the key types above? tubular?

#7 BLK

BLK

    Pure Genius

  • Members
  • 321 posts

Posted 22 February 2007 - 09:22 AM

some of these machines have wafer locks and some have Acer (the ones with tubular keys) and the ones that have been tampered with get a sturdy hasp and a padlock. :)
Bump it to the next level.

#8 theopratr

theopratr

    The Wise One

  • Members
  • 454 posts

Posted 22 February 2007 - 12:47 PM

All of the keys and locks you posted are very modern high-security tubular locks, which are not bumpable. There are a variety of tools on the locksmithing market that are capable of opening them, but they run anywhere from $80 to $400 or more.

I doubt that any of these would be found on an early '90s video game machine. As BLK states, it's probably a wafer or older tubular lock. If you can get a picture of the lock on the actual machine, or of the key that's used to open it, we can be of more help to you.

#9 MrLocks

MrLocks

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 100 posts

Posted 13 May 2011 - 08:18 AM

some of these machines have wafer locks and some have Acer (the ones with tubular keys) and the ones that have been tampered with get a sturdy hasp and a padlock. :)

I agree with you that some of them are with wafer an some with acer
Sandy