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sc20 key


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#1 sniper101

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 06:07 PM

hi, i am wondering if i were to take my sc4 or sc1 key to a key cutter and ask him to cop it to a sc20 key.would it still work as a bump key and everything since it is the same design, because i'd rather not wait for shipping to order the sc20.

thanks.

#2 theopratr

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 11:37 PM

If you take the SC-4 in and have it copied to an SC-20, you will have an operational SC-20 bump key. The beauty of the SC-20 is that it will open ANY Schlage cylinder, any keyway, regardless of the number of pins. By copying the SC-1 to the SC-20 blank, you'd have a master key for the five pin locks only, where the SC-4 will work transfer to work on five or six pin setups.

Best of bumping!

#3 WOT

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 02:08 AM

If you take the SC-4 in and have it copied to an SC-20, you will have an operational SC-20 bump key. The beauty of the SC-20 is that it will open ANY Schlage cylinder, any keyway, regardless of the number of pins. By copying the SC-1 to the SC-20 blank, you'd have a master key for the five pin locks only, where the SC-4 will work transfer to work on five or six pin setups.

Best of bumping!


With Best cores, you can use a 7 pin blank on a 5 pin, because the key is tip stopped. The bow just sticks out more. On shoulder stopped locks (almost all, except Best) wouldn't using a blank meant for a lock with more pins (i.e. 6 pin blank on 5 pin) cauase the tip to collide into something inside before the shoulder could touch the face?

There are some keyways you can't open with SC20. Schlage has at least a dozen or so keyways not compatible with SC20

SC19 is the 5 pin equivalent of the SC20.

#4 theopratr

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 10:39 AM

On shoulder stopped locks (almost all, except Best) wouldn't using a blank meant for a lock with more pins (i.e. 6 pin blank on 5 pin) cauase the tip to collide into something inside before the shoulder could touch the face?


In the interior of the lock, even if it is a shoulder stop, there is sufficient room in the lock to insert the six pin key. This is not always the case, but it's true the majority of the time.

If there is insufficient room, as is sometimes the case, you simply use the pull out method with more than one pin pulled out. For example, using an SC-20 on a lock meant to take an SC-1, only insert your bump key four pins deep. When I was first experimenting with bump keys, the first key that I successfully used to but a five pin Schlage cylinder was an SC-4 using the above method.

In short, for cylinders where the difference is more than one pin and the key would reach the far rear of the cylinder, use the pull out method. Otherwise, in many cases, minimal movement can still be used as the keyway continues significantly further than what would be necessary for the required key.

I have a picture of an unmounted Schlage cylinder which demonstrates what I'm talking about, I'll revise this post when I get home. :)