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Filing my own KW1 key


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#1 kinghajj

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 10:48 PM

I filed down the "valleys" first. That was pretty easy; I found a file that perfectly fit. Then I filed down the "peaks," and then the shoulder and tip. The key goes in and comes out easily.

But I can't get it to work.

I've tried bumping with a screwdriver and a spatula (a rubber one, has "bounce.") I think the problem may be with the key itself, so here's a picture of it.

Posted Image

Maybe the peaks should be filed down more?

All help is greatly appreciated!

#2 theopratr

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 11:56 AM

Are you attempting to use the pull-out method or the minimal movement method?

In either case, the size of the peaks aren't an issue, it's the shape of them. The face of the peaks that impacts the pins needs to be sloped in such a way as to throw the pins upwards... at approximately the same slope as the way you've filed your shoulder.

All in all, you speaks look too concave downwards to work. When the resting pins hit your peaks, they simply stop without an effective transfer of energy. Make sure they are at an even slope so that the pins will be "thrown". Filing down the backs of the peaks in the same fashion isn't necessary to successful bumping, it makes it easier to get your key in and out of the lock.

Additionally, if you're opting for the pull-out method, I'd recommend filing the first, larger peak down into one that's the same size as all the others, leaving a stage of sorts, an extension of the key, out in front of it, so that it looks like this:

Posted Image

Tends to make things easier if you have a nasty sort of lock.

Aside from all of this, if you still have no luck, try filing down your grooves a bit. It doesn't look like you need it, but the limits are extremely small.

Remember - just a tap with your screwdriver handle, and a bit of tension. Nothing crazy!

Best of luck.

#3 kinghajj

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Posted 15 January 2007 - 05:05 PM

I tried making the peaks steeper, but that didn't work, so I tried making another key, but that hasn't worked either. I went to a locksmith today and he made me a key ground down the the lowest position, but didn't leave any peaks. I tried it anyway, but after shaving down the tip/shoulder and then trying the re-make the peaks, it didn't work either. I think I'll just buy some from here, or go back the the locksmith and show him what the peaks should look like.

#4 WOT

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 11:16 AM

I tried making the peaks steeper, but that didn't work, so I tried making another key, but that hasn't worked either. I went to a locksmith today and he made me a key ground down the the lowest position, but didn't leave any peaks. I tried it anyway, but after shaving down the tip/shoulder and then trying the re-make the peaks, it didn't work either. I think I'll just buy some from here, or go back the the locksmith and show him what the peaks should look like.


Go to a locksmith who has a proper code machine and have him make a KW1 key with "77777" cut depths. (Kwikset only has 7 depths, (1-7), no such thing as "9 cut" and if you ask for "9" cut he's going to be suspicious of you, because that is out of spec)

Once that is made, have him duplicate it on a standard duplicator on another blank. Use the copy. Put the original code cut to be used as a master key for duplicating unless you want to risk ruining it and pay again to have it code cut.

#5 LockGoddess

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 12:55 PM

[quote name='WOT][quote=kinghajj']I tried making the peaks steeper, but that didn't work, so I tried making another key, but that hasn't worked either. I went to a locksmith today and he made me a key ground down the the lowest position, but didn't leave any peaks. I tried it anyway, but after shaving down the tip/shoulder and then trying the re-make the peaks, it didn't work either. I think I'll just buy some from here, or go back the the locksmith and show him what the peaks should look like.[/quote]

Go to a locksmith who has a proper code machine and have him make a KW1 key with "77777" cut depths. (Kwikset only has 7 depths, (1-7), no such thing as "9 cut" and if you ask for "9" cut he's going to be suspicious of you, because that is out of spec)

Once that is made, have him duplicate it on a standard duplicator on another blank. Use the copy. Put the original code cut to be used as a master key for duplicating unless you want to risk ruining it and pay again to have it code cut.[/quote]


Actually there is a 9 depth on Kwikset. It is on the CMK31 Code card and is used when master pinning kwikset locks.

#6 ChicagoLocks

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 11:15 PM

Try to make peak more steeper that it will push the pins upward which is fixed on a spring. Sharp edges in peak will make the bumping little difficult.
Sandy

#7 kazankoph

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 09:32 PM

about how high do the peaks have to be from the blade? can someone measure theirs?