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Bump key question


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#1 aspiring_bump3r

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Posted 22 December 2006 - 05:35 PM

hey i just received my bump key set
and i noticed the valleys ( spaces in between)
some seem ok, but some are kinda sloppy

overall its not totally 100% uniform, dont get me wrong im not complaining.
i would say they are 95% nice but some just seem a tiny little bit off

well it still be able to bump?


oh i also noticed the machine cut keys spaces are way bigger than my hand cut one. I think this gives more space for the pins to drop in? good thing right?


sorry for so many questions,i gotta wait for tomorrow to make copies and begin bumping, so im realy anxious! haha



Aspiring Bump3r

#2 Customer Support

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Posted 22 December 2006 - 06:32 PM

I know I've read this message somewhere else.... hrm.... ohh yes the PM you sent me :wink:


Your keys should look like: Posted Image The peeks are nice and small.

James K. - Lead Support
For Order specific questions please use the 'contact us' link at the top of our store.


#3 theopratr

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Posted 23 December 2006 - 01:49 AM

The valleys that you refer to are smaller on handmade keys as when using most kinds of files, people just cut it down to a point. It still works, but requires a little more precision in making the key and a little more skill in bumping. If the pin is not resting exactly at the deep point that you filed down, it could be resting above the shear line, which equals a no-go for bumping. Thus, when making keys by hand, using a square file of a slightly greater diameter than the pins in the lock for which the key is being made is best when finishing each valley; that way the entire pin is resting as it's lowest level, with no possibility of being over the shear line, and there's some wiggle room in terms of the exact position of the center of the pin.

The machine cut keys are essentially the way they're supposed to be... nice large valleys such that the entire face of the pin rests in it.

In terms of being uniform... as long as the lowest cut valley is at a depth that is at or below the lowest cut for that key, and the peaks are high enough to hit the pin when the bump key slams into the lock to send the top pins above the shear line... you're golden. The actual uniformity of the depth of the gaps is of little concern.

Uniformity does look pretty though. :D

#4 aspiring_bump3r

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Posted 23 December 2006 - 02:37 AM

Whoa! nicely worded, you are obviously a very well spoken man.
Thanks for explaining about the spaces. Now i totally understand bigger space more higher chance of the pin sitting nicely in the gap!


funny thing is my first ever handmade cut bump key
worked pretty good...until it broke in half!

And i cant seem to bump any of the keys i ordered yet.
But i think its because im not used to the pull out one click method.

I will shave the shoulders and tip
minimal movement method
and report back!


Keep on Bumping Bumpers!
wish me luck!

#5 theopratr

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Posted 23 December 2006 - 10:51 AM

funny thing is my first ever handmade cut bump key
worked pretty good...until it broke in half!


lol I had similar success with a homemade key as my first project that had the gaps filed into points. If the pins rest in the pointed gaps at a level that would be equivalent or lower than where they would with a flat surface, you have no worries. The added bonus is that the pins begin in direct contact with a peak, such that they're guaranteed to bounce effectively. Sometimes, however, this can be a detriment because it takes marginally more force to move the key against the force of the pins.

#6 aspiring_bump3r

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Posted 23 December 2006 - 05:50 PM

what about the weiss key i think its called?

why is it soo super thin
i slid it into my lock and it almost drops in, so thin and skinny.

can i even bump this lock if the keys practically drops in the keyhole?

#7 theopratr

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Posted 23 December 2006 - 08:25 PM

What's the alpha-numeric designation? A Weiser is a WR-5, most commonly, which is quite bumpable.

#8 MrLocks

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 10:40 PM

Without looking images no one can really tell that whether they work or not. But all and all the gaps and valleys should be uniform
Sandy