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Help bumping my Schlage Everest


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#1 Lfx36

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Posted 22 December 2015 - 09:08 PM

Hi guys,

I recently purchased a schlage Everest bump key from here: http://www.wallofshe...s-c123-bump-key

I've been having a hard time learning picking my Everest so I figured I would start off bumping but now even that is giving me trouble! I don't know if it's my technique (seems pretty simple to me) or if I bought bumps that just aren't going to work. Any help would be appreciated.

#2 LogiGoi

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Posted 23 December 2015 - 10:36 AM

Hi guys,

I recently purchased a schlage Everest bump key from here: http://www.wallofshe...s-c123-bump-key

I've been having a hard time learning picking my Everest so I figured I would start off bumping but now even that is giving me trouble! I don't know if it's my technique (seems pretty simple to me) or if I bought bumps that just aren't going to work. Any help would be appreciated.

I'm not an expert when it comes to that matter but there are many good people in this forum who can surely help you...This site also has their own customer service...have you asked the customer service of your site about this matter??? :)



#3 Customer Support

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Posted 23 December 2015 - 01:53 PM

That's a tricky question and really can't answer it.

 

To my knowledge that site, and others like it, simply resell keys form another vendor and do not actually make their own products.  Are you able to post a picture of what the key actually looks like? 


James K. - Lead Support
For Order specific questions please use the 'contact us' link at the top of our store.


#4 redcity

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Posted 24 December 2015 - 10:58 PM

Hi guys,

I recently purchased a schlage Everest bump key from here: http://www.wallofshe...s-c123-bump-key

I've been having a hard time learning picking my Everest so I figured I would start off bumping but now even that is giving me trouble! I don't know if it's my technique (seems pretty simple to me) or if I bought bumps that just aren't going to work. Any help would be appreciated.

It's really sad to see people getting so much frustrated at bumping after buying a key from an online store that doesn't even bother to display a short guide to help their customers to get through bumping with the keys they are selling them on such a high price. 



#5 Lfx36

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Posted 25 December 2015 - 07:23 PM

So guys, I managed to bump my own lock! It took a few days of toiling but I got it. Now I'm working on another schlage Everest though I'm not necessarily sure it's a c123 and I'm not sure I can tell which version it is simply based on the key way.

#6 Lfx36

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Posted 25 December 2015 - 07:29 PM

It's so weird thigh that I'm having trouble recreating the bump of my first lock. I've considered getting some washers to put around the shoulders of the key. What is your guys opinion? What is more often done - too much torque or too much/too little striking force with the hammer (in my case heel of a shoe)

#7 redcity

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Posted 26 December 2015 - 01:32 AM

So guys, I managed to bump my own lock! It took a few days of toiling but I got it. Now I'm working on another schlage Everest though I'm not necessarily sure it's a c123 and I'm not sure I can tell which version it is simply based on the key way.

Well, its nice to hear that you finally succeeded at bumping and c123 is like the one shown below, i recommend you should post a picture of the key you are working on in here, so that we can help you in further ventures.

m2MP4UAae0tIP6qyMgwSBrA.jpg



#8 redcity

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Posted 26 December 2015 - 03:24 AM

It's so weird thigh that I'm having trouble recreating the bump of my first lock. I've considered getting some washers to put around the shoulders of the key. What is your guys opinion? What is more often done - too much torque or too much/too little striking force with the hammer (in my case heel of a shoe)

Well, it's difficult for a newbie but you will master it as you go on with the right technique. You mentioned the use of washers around the shoulders, well yes it's one of the technique and is often recommended by the sellers to get along with bumping for newbies but there are different methods for using  a bump key to transfer force to the pins inside the lock.  First  insert the key all the way, and then pull it back one pin. Then, hit the back of the key (the part where you normally hold on to it) with a solid object such as a hammer or in your case heel of a shoe, and then turn the key a split-second later. Note the exact timing for the turning of the lock to be critical, requiring quite a bit of practice. While this method worked on some locks, it did not work on a great many others. Among other problems: when keys had very deep cuts, the trick tended to not work either because the pins would still be pushed in too far by the parts of the bump key between the deepest points. So i hope it works with your lock if still you are having some problem then do some adjustments or modifications as described below:

 

Normally, if you insert a key all the way into the lock, the pins inside the lock touch the deepest point of the cut in the key at the point where the shoulder of the key makes contact with the inner cylinder of the lock(Do not use washers at this point). By filing a tiny bit of metal off both the tip and the shoulder of the key, we can create a bump key that can go just a little bit deeper into the lock. When such a bump key is inserted all the way into the lock, it will be pushed out again a tiny bit by the force of the springs inside the lock, until the pins again rest on the deepest point in the key cuts.Now that you have your modified bump key, you need to hit the back of the key with something that applies the right amount of impulse power, without having so much weight that it would damage the bump key or the lock. So in this respect, (do not use the heel of shoe), use a proper bumping hammer having balanced weight to push the pins inside.



#9 LogiGoi

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Posted 26 December 2015 - 08:52 AM

Well, it's difficult for a newbie but you will master it as you go on with the right technique. You mentioned the use of washers around the shoulders, well yes it's one of the technique and is often recommended by the sellers to get along with bumping for newbies but there are different methods for using  a bump key to transfer force to the pins inside the lock.  First  insert the key all the way, and then pull it back one pin. Then, hit the back of the key (the part where you normally hold on to it) with a solid object such as a hammer or in your case heel of a shoe, and then turn the key a split-second later. Note the exact timing for the turning of the lock to be critical, requiring quite a bit of practice. While this method worked on some locks, it did not work on a great many others. Among other problems: when keys had very deep cuts, the trick tended to not work either because the pins would still be pushed in too far by the parts of the bump key between the deepest points. So i hope it works with your lock if still you are having some problem then do some adjustments or modifications as described below:

 

Normally, if you insert a key all the way into the lock, the pins inside the lock touch the deepest point of the cut in the key at the point where the shoulder of the key makes contact with the inner cylinder of the lock(Do not use washers at this point). By filing a tiny bit of metal off both the tip and the shoulder of the key, we can create a bump key that can go just a little bit deeper into the lock. When such a bump key is inserted all the way into the lock, it will be pushed out again a tiny bit by the force of the springs inside the lock, until the pins again rest on the deepest point in the key cuts.Now that you have your modified bump key, you need to hit the back of the key with something that applies the right amount of impulse power, without having so much weight that it would damage the bump key or the lock. So in this respect, (do not use the heel of shoe), use a proper bumping hammer having balanced weight to push the pins inside.

Dude, you actually gave so many ideas about lock bumping...honestly, I had no idea that lock bumping or bump keys exists...what I only know is lock picking or using slim jim...I just discovered this forum when I was searching about lock picking and voila...I really learned a lot from this forum especially from you..I appreciate men, thanks... 



#10 redcity

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Posted 26 December 2015 - 10:04 AM

Dude, you actually gave so many ideas about lock bumping...honestly, I had no idea that lock bumping or bump keys exists...what I only know is lock picking or using slim jim...I just discovered this forum when I was searching about lock picking and voila...I really learned a lot from this forum especially from you..I appreciate men, thanks... 

I am happy to share my knowledge with you people


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#11 Lfx36

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Posted 26 December 2015 - 10:57 AM

Here is my key: czeDfDO.jpg

 

I always thought you applied torque throughout the whole motion, whereas you are suggesting just to apply torque a millisecond after impacting with the hammer/shoe heel which is interesting. Currently I am applying a decent amount of torque throughout the motion while striking. I haven't bumped the lock again yet but I can hear 4 or 5 pins dropping once I release my torque on the key so does that mean I'm close?

 

I think I am going to go to a hardware store and buy some washers. I'm not 100% sure where I would place the washers (the shoulders?) and hopefully I will not have to modify this key at all in order to put the washers on it.



#12 Lfx36

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Posted 26 December 2015 - 06:50 PM

Okay guys, here is how my key looks with the washer on. I'm not sure if the washer is in the right place - should I be moving it to where the red arrow I drew is pointing? I believe that's the shoulder.] http://i.imgur.com/il1rOZj.jpg?1

 

I may not be able to post more for a couple of days because of the forum restrictions so I'll get my questions out of the way:

 

1. I ordered a bump hammer - will I notice a significant advantage using it compared with my shoe?

2. Given that I have a c123 bump key, do you think I'd be able to bump a c124 or c125? They all have the same check pin after all.

 

Thanks all


Edited by Lfx36, 26 December 2015 - 06:50 PM.


#13 Lfx36

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Posted 26 December 2015 - 10:27 PM

Its so weird. If I use light tension like many have suggested here and elsewhere, I'll strike (now I'm using a meat pounder, lol) and then when I reset the key I won't hear anything. But if I put significant torque on the key and then strike, when I reset the key I definitely hear pins falling. So I'm not sure which is best.



#14 TanVanMan

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Posted 27 December 2015 - 10:31 PM

Its so weird. If I use light tension like many have suggested here and elsewhere, I'll strike (now I'm using a meat pounder, lol) and then when I reset the key I won't hear anything. But if I put significant torque on the key and then strike, when I reset the key I definitely hear pins falling. So I'm not sure which is best.

Well I guess whichever works for you would be the best. :-) Depends on every individual.