Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Do bump keys work on vehicles as well?


  • Please log in to reply
34 replies to this topic

#21 treelovinhippie

treelovinhippie

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 05 February 2007 - 10:52 PM

I've never seen that before... Did you happen to see what they were using for tension? Perhaps an original key? :roll: :lol:




:D

#22 BLK

BLK

    Pure Genius

  • Members
  • 321 posts

Posted 06 February 2007 - 05:57 AM

I knew a girl in high school that could do that without the tennis ball. I sure do miss her. :(
Bump it to the next level.

#23 C0wT1pp3r

C0wT1pp3r

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 53 posts

Posted 23 February 2007 - 02:15 PM

i've seen a video where someone picks a car ignition with something. im not sure what it was but it looked like a lockpick set, not a bump key...

i doubt that you'll be able to find one though. as far as i know there are no double sided bump keys.

#24 theopratr

theopratr

    The Wise One

  • Members
  • 454 posts

Posted 23 February 2007 - 02:56 PM

Some of the European high security locks are simply pin tumblers that have more than one (or two!) sides to the key. Picking would be a nightmare on a three sided key (3 sides x 5 pins each = 15 pins) but the bump key that was made for it opened it, no issues.

The auto opening tool that you refer to was probably a jiggler. See also, "automotive try-out key".

#25 C0wT1pp3r

C0wT1pp3r

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 53 posts

Posted 24 February 2007 - 08:27 AM

how would air pressure move the pins into the right position and open the lock? you would still have to use a tension bar or something to turn the lock. otherwise the pins will just jump into position then right back out again.

#26 theopratr

theopratr

    The Wise One

  • Members
  • 454 posts

Posted 24 February 2007 - 11:04 AM

The tennis ball thing was a joke.

#27 C0wT1pp3r

C0wT1pp3r

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 53 posts

Posted 24 February 2007 - 11:25 AM

oh. well, i thought about it for a few hours and i was thinking that if you used a compressed air tank with a hose and a small airtight slot for a tension bar you could do a mix of bumping and picking at the same time and open a lock. but that is a bit much...

#28 Joe42

Joe42

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 40 posts

Posted 17 March 2007 - 10:53 PM

I drive a 93 Pontiac Grand Prix, and judging from the keys, I'd have to say both the door and ignition can be picked with standard picks, and therefore, should just as easily be bumped. But, there's lots of play in door lock and sometimes I have to jiggle the key to get it to open, so bumping may not work so well.

Both keys resemble regular household keys, even though they are clearly GM keys and neither is double sided.

Also, I've been inside the driver's door on my car several times to repair the badly designed door handle, so I can tell you the lock cylinder is just a basic 5 pin lock with a tab on the end, attached to a rod which moves the locking bar deeper inside the door. It's nothing special, but the tension required to turn the key is pretty high, so you would need a very stout tension wrench.


I'd say it's possible to pick or bump some older vehicles, but this is just pure speculation based on what I know of my own car.

#29 theopratr

theopratr

    The Wise One

  • Members
  • 454 posts

Posted 19 March 2007 - 12:09 AM

I can sum up the entire automotive realm with this:

1.) Most cars use wafer locks, which can not be bumped. No way, no how; the design doesn't have pins to jump.

2.) Some cars do have pin tumblers. (<5% of the total cars on the road) Because they are pin tumblers, they could theoretically be bumped.

3.) There are so many different blanks for cars, varying by model and year, that it would be a waste of time to attempt to produce bump keys for vehicles.

4.) There are very few instances where the blanks are common to a wide range of models and years, ignoring the fact that most of the locks are wafer locks and can not be bumped anyway.

5.) If you were to find a car that used a five pin tumbler, and you were able to identify the blank and go to the trouble of making yourself a key for that car, you can probably get it open in under a minute by a.) picking b.) jiggler or c.) slim jim, clothes hanger, etc.

In conclusion, automobile locks are not viable for mainstream bumpage.

#30 Bump123

Bump123

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts

Posted 19 March 2007 - 06:23 AM

It's kind of funny, how its a "STANDARD" to have higher security locks on your car, which is only worth a fraction of your house, and the sense of security is alot less... Believe it or not, people (criminals) are getting more ballsy, with the whole forced entry.... (at least in my area)

#31 theopratr

theopratr

    The Wise One

  • Members
  • 454 posts

Posted 19 March 2007 - 10:58 AM

The fact that bumping is largely ineffective on cars is a rather ironic end, considering that the locks on cars are not high security at all. The majority of cars can be opened, with practice, in under twenty seconds with a set of try-out keys that fit nicely on your key ring. And then those pesky cars that have better locks (double sided nine pin, or a weird mechanism perhaps...) generally have window seals that are disgustingly easy to compromise.

In short, although bumping and autos don't mix, don't go throwing your valuables under your front seat just because the TV told you that your neighborhood is crawling with delinquents carrying bump keys.

#32 marez

marez

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 21 March 2007 - 06:38 PM

Theres master keys for hondas,nissans,acuras,fords and other few cars. You can buy them online for about 15 bucks a key. I got a honda master key which is the most common one. They work well

#33 sniper101

sniper101

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65 posts

Posted 22 March 2007 - 11:14 AM

Marez: I have never heard of these kind of keys. The only keys i know of for cars are tryout keys or jiggler keys. If you would be kind enough to post a site linking to them, i am curious about them. Thanks in advanced.

#34 marez

marez

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 22 March 2007 - 01:29 PM

http://www.nbc5i.com...969/detail.html
That's the nbc news.

http://www.hawleyloc...egory_Code=BAXT
Thats were I got them at.

They are called tryout keys but master keys is a slang for the average joe.

I found out about masterkeys before bump keys because I knew people who had them.

#35 bentpick

bentpick

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 51 posts

Posted 24 March 2007 - 09:59 PM

If the car has wafer locks....watch out....those babies can be picked in SECONDS. Use jigglers with or without a tension wrench and BAM! You're in! When using a tension wrench use the type with double tips...preferably with small notches and 1/2 inch tips...this allows for pushing back the dust cover and not slipping out of the key entrance. I'm talking Seconds and you're in! :) Try out keys are a waste of money!!!!!!