Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

this site in the news


  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#1 lockpicker30

lockpicker30

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 19 November 2006 - 12:43 PM

ABC12 uses \ buys our keys:
http://abclocal.go.c...ocal&id=4996100

(edited by admin)

#2 Kristic

Kristic

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 243 posts

Posted 19 November 2006 - 03:16 PM

haha, we're famous!

#3 Customer Support

Customer Support

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 753 posts

Posted 19 November 2006 - 04:45 PM

Hrm....

Wonder why they didn't mention the site name....

I do agree about how well our bump keys work :D

James K. - Lead Support
For Order specific questions please use the 'contact us' link at the top of our store.


#4 Kristic

Kristic

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 243 posts

Posted 19 November 2006 - 07:26 PM

Hrm....

Wonder why they didn't mention the site name....

I do agree about how well our bump keys work :D


Yeah, it would have been great promotion to see the sites name on the news. Oh well, when you search bump keys, this is the first result for google, so the advertising for the site isn't completely needed.

Still awesome to see the site in the news, hopefully it doesnt encourage lock companies to make bump proof locks the standard

#5 digitxm

digitxm

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 139 posts

Posted 22 November 2006 - 05:21 PM

That's great, you even got the news buying from ya!

#6 BLK

BLK

    Pure Genius

  • Members
  • 321 posts

Posted 22 November 2006 - 08:51 PM

We had a piece on the 10:00 pm news last night about bumping locks. They interviewed a local locksmith who recommended Medeco (@ $150.00 for a cheap one) as a way to keep from getting bumped. I mentioned in another thread that there was a locksmith at a conference a couple of years ago that bumped 15 or 20 Medecos in a row. Medeco promptly hired him to work in their R&D department.

I still say if you use a better lock they will break a window or kick a door in if they want in. A crook will find another way in if he wants in regardless of what kind of lock you have protecting your door. And that's where Smith & Wesson can be of help....

[Steps off of Soap Box, cleans S&W 39-2, makes sure all clips are full]
Bump it to the next level.

#7 Kristic

Kristic

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 243 posts

Posted 22 November 2006 - 09:21 PM

We had a piece on the 10:00 pm news last night about bumping locks. They interviewed a local locksmith who recommended Medeco (@ $150.00 for a cheap one) as a way to keep from getting bumped. I mentioned in another thread that there was a locksmith at a conference a couple of years ago that bumped 15 or 20 Medecos in a row. Medeco promptly hired him to work in their R&D department.

I still say if you use a better lock they will break a window or kick a door in if they want in. A crook will find another way in if he wants in regardless of what kind of lock you have protecting your door. And that's where Smith & Wesson can be of help....

[Steps off of Soap Box, cleans S&W 39-2, makes sure all clips are full]


Exactly. if the criminal wants to get into the house, he will. Whether it be break a window, or break the door. No lock is 100% safe, people need to realize that. Whether its a 30 dollar lock, or a 100 dollar lock, it can still be beaten off the door using a crowbar.

#8 kutibah

kutibah

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Posted 22 November 2006 - 11:20 PM

That's why we have alarm systems :D

#9 digitxm

digitxm

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 139 posts

Posted 23 November 2006 - 12:11 AM

Yeah, i think it is actually kind of funny that they make such a big deal about it. ALL OF A SUDDEN your homes are not safe......right.

#10 BLK

BLK

    Pure Genius

  • Members
  • 321 posts

Posted 23 November 2006 - 02:05 AM

Yeah, i think it is actually kind of funny that they make such a big deal about it. ALL OF A SUDDEN your homes are not safe......right.



Very well said!
Bump it to the next level.

#11 Customer Support

Customer Support

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 753 posts

Posted 09 February 2007 - 09:19 PM

ABC12 ;)

http://abclocal.go.c...ocal&id=4996100

James K. - Lead Support
For Order specific questions please use the 'contact us' link at the top of our store.


#12 theopratr

theopratr

    The Wise One

  • Members
  • 454 posts

Posted 09 February 2007 - 11:28 PM

Another one telling people to spray WD-40 into their locks?

I wonder if it's a hilarious trail of misinformation, or if I've missed something.

I vote for the former.

#13 BLK

BLK

    Pure Genius

  • Members
  • 321 posts

Posted 10 February 2007 - 06:40 AM

Another one telling people to spray WD-40 into their locks?

I wonder if it's a hilarious trail of misinformation, or if I've missed something.

I vote for the former.


Well, let's see, how often does the media get anything right? 2%, maybe 3% on a good day?
Bump it to the next level.

#14 kespup

kespup

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 31 posts

Posted 10 March 2007 - 12:41 AM

Slickj that ABC article you linked to mentions using WD-40 sprayed in a lock to prevent bumping. I would think WD-40 sprayed in a lock would make it easier.

I wanted to try filing a key. So I took my bumpkey.us SC1 and SC4 to Home Depot. I knew they knew nothing about keys and the clerk proved it. He used the same blank for both keys. The five pin cut was OK and the six pin cut was cut for five and a fraction of a pin. Had this been a real key I would be returning it as it would not work.

Anyway I had two copies of each key made to play with. I used a copy of the SC1 in one of my locks and it opened on the first bump. However the key got bent and I was able to snap it off with just my fingers.

Point is your better of buying extra keys from bumpkey.us as they are a high quality key. Home Depot only charged me $1.43 for a key and you use it once and then you better throw it away.

#15 Psilocybe

Psilocybe

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts

Posted 15 May 2007 - 08:10 PM

Slickj that ABC article you linked to mentions using WD-40 sprayed in a lock to prevent bumping. I would think WD-40 sprayed in a lock would make it easier.


I think I understand the logic behind the WD-40 thing. If you lube it up, the bottom pins will more easily rise when you bump it. If both the top and bottom pins go up, the bump will fail. I'll have to try it for myself and see how effective it is though.

#16 theopratr

theopratr

    The Wise One

  • Members
  • 454 posts

Posted 15 May 2007 - 09:33 PM

In theory that would be the case, but no matter how much you grease up your proverbial Newton's cradle, it's still only going to be the last ball that moves. In this case, the lubricant facilitates the movement of the top pins over the shear line; if you're striking the key with the right amount of force, the bottom pins will never be moving at all. (Or negligibly so, at least.)

#17 kespup

kespup

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 31 posts

Posted 15 May 2007 - 10:07 PM

I did use WD-40 and it did make the bumping more efective. However I was informed on this fourm that it is not good for a lock.

I also understand that graphite is also bad for a lock as it can build up and clog the lock.

So I now use "Lock Saver Synthetic Lubricant For All Locks". I spray first then bump. Makes the bumping more efective and it is good for the lock. I use the aerosol.

http://www.mil-comm....lubricants.html

P.S. There are many Locksmiths who spray WD-40 before they pick a lock.

#18 Psilocybe

Psilocybe

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts

Posted 15 May 2007 - 10:58 PM

no matter how much you grease up your proverbial Newton's cradle, it's still only going to be the last ball that moves. . .the bottom pins will never be moving at all. (Or negligibly so, at least.)


While I don't doubt you when you say that WD-40 makes bumping easier, there is a slight problem with your logic, at least in that first part of the quote. Newton's Cradle involves a direct impact, while bumping involves a "side impact." The bottom pins have to move up (negligibly so, as you put it). If the bottom pins didn't move at all, the key wouldn't be able to slide forward when you bumped it, as the pins would be in the way of the peaks (or ramps, as the glossary says).

That being said, I have a question related to that, if you don't mind my asking. If the lock to be bumped has a 9 pin in it, wouldn't it be near impossible to bump with a machine cut 999 key, due to the reasoning in the previous paragraph?

#19 Customer Support

Customer Support

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 753 posts

Posted 16 May 2007 - 12:35 AM

That being said, I have a question related to that, if you don't mind my asking. If the lock to be bumped has a 9 pin in it, wouldn't it be near impossible to bump with a machine cut 999 key, due to the reasoning in the previous paragraph?


If this was the case, one would simply have to file the valley a bit deeper thus allowing the pin to bump up when struck.

James K. - Lead Support
For Order specific questions please use the 'contact us' link at the top of our store.


#20 theopratr

theopratr

    The Wise One

  • Members
  • 454 posts

Posted 16 May 2007 - 01:59 AM

My Newton's Cradle example is just for visualisation... as you mention, it doesn't quite work like that. However, the bottom pins are incapable of appreciable lateral movement, being encased in the plug, making the effective force from the bump key in the vertical direction only.

Dealing, then, with only one direction, the angle at which the bottom pin is approached makes all the difference. The net force applied to the pin stack is at a perpendicular to the angle of the ramp. The best bump keys are cut such that the ramp strikes the bottom pin at such an angle such that the force is large enough to get the top pins to move enough to clear the shear line, yet small enough to not also displace the bottom pins more than a small fraction of a millimeter. (This being based on even the smallest bottom pins being more massive than the top pins - the smaller bottom pins have a tendency to move quite a bit more, due to conservation of momentum, but since they are far away from the shear line, this doesn't matter.)

Posted Image

(Large red arrows show net force on the pin stack, and the smaller arrow next to it shows the effective vertical force.)

The diagram demonstrates different angled peaks. The steeper the peak, the smaller the effective vertical force transfered to the pin stack. In most cases, lesser force is better as to not minimize the bottom pins movement. This is obviously limited by the fact that there is a maximum angle at which the grooves can be cut and still have the key be inserted easily. There must also be enough vertical energy to move the top pins, although this generally isn't the problem. An angle too low will transfer too much vertical energy to the pin stack, and both pins will jump over the shear line, assuming enough force has been applied to the key itself.

I would come to some conclusion, but I spent the last three hours fixing my car, and it's almost 4:00 AM here, so I'll just say that I'm sure you see what I'm getting at. The WD-40 or equivalent lube makes it so that the more massive bottom pin that is transmitting most of the energy still does just that, while the top pin can move more freely and is less likely to get caught at the shear line.

As you rather cleverly pointed out, the bottom pins do move a little bit. It is for this very reason, that slick has already pointed out, that most bump keys are cut a bit deeper than a "true" 999 key. A bump key and a 999 key being equated is out of descriptive necessity I suppose, as they really aren't the same thing.