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Correct Spacing For Gaps


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#1 Customer Support

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Posted 09 August 2006 - 06:48 PM

The correct bump key gap spacing for tons of keys, schlage, SEGAL, Arrow, Falcon, Eagle, Best, KABA and a ton more..

Check Out:

http://www.dlaco.com/spacing/tips.htm (doesn't work at present)


And then make a back up for everyone to use:

http://www.shortText.com/mhy04

#2 Pleiades

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 07:23 PM

Haha, the “we have closed this page” message is funny. Seriously though, I just put old keys that are already cut on a computer scanner along with a ruler. Scan the keys at a high resolution, and then load it into your favourite image editor. Make sure your image editor is using the correct DPI (number of pixels per inch, this should have been shows somewhere when you scanned it) so that the measuring tool will give accurate numbers. Verify this by measuring the image of the ruler. Now you can go ahead and measure the spacing and depth.

#3 lockman

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 03:40 PM

Some people learnt nothing from Prohibition.

Are key micrometers and dial calipers next on the list - I dont think so.

#4 Customer Support

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 05:14 PM

OK OK....

So when all else fails where do you turn? ARCHIVE.ORG BABY!

http://web.archive.o...pacing/tips.htm

And then make a back up for everyone to use:

http://www.shortText.com/mhy04

James K. - Lead Support
For Order specific questions please use the 'contact us' link at the top of our store.


#5 siggy

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 03:26 AM

Ok, so help me make sure I'm reading this table correctly: If I want to make a bump key for a particular brand of cylinder, I should make a key with the cuts to a depth which makes the distance from the bottom of the key to the bottom of the cut equal to or slightly less than the value listed as the root depth of the highest number for that particular key?

I work in a machine shop and have spare time at night, so I'd like to be able to knock out a nice little set of bump keys during my spare time, but being a machinist, I like to check my work. Also, how high would you say the peaks should be? 1 or 2 values lower than the root depth? More? Less?

Siggy

#6 theopratr

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 09:09 AM

You are reading the charts correctly, sir. The absolute height of the peaks really depends on how separated the individual cuts are... the further they are from each other, the higher the peak you can get away with. For the majority of keys, to get a good angle on the peak (appx. 45 degrees, perhaps a bit steeper) this is achieved by using a depth for the top of the peak that is maybe two values less deep than the final cuts; a 7 cut for the top of the peaks, and a 9.5 or so for the grooves, for example.

Obviously, the best way to find out for a specific key is to experiment. :) If it doesn't look right, it probably isn't, so always cut less than you think is necessary and work your way down.

#7 LogiGoi

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Posted 14 December 2015 - 11:40 AM

Haha, the we have closed this page message is funny. Seriously though, I just put old keys that are already cut on a computer scanner along with a ruler. Scan the keys at a high resolution, and then load it into your favourite image editor. Make sure your image editor is using the correct DPI (number of pixels per inch, this should have been shows somewhere when you scanned it) so that the measuring tool will give accurate numbers. Verify this by measuring the image of the ruler. Now you can go ahead and measure the spacing and depth.

I never thought of using a scanner to scan other things other than flat materials especially papers...and by scanner what I 'm thinking right now is the scanner that has a printer with it...are we on the same page???



#8 redcity

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Posted 13 January 2016 - 06:57 AM

Follow these guidelines, it may prove handy 

4873ciw.jpg


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